Affiliate Resources, Inc. | Resources for Affiliate Marketing

Denver Jobs

A community to help Denver job posters and job-seekers come together.
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Helping New Businesses Survive & Thrive

**Welcome to "YourBusiness" subreddit** We created this subredit to help new entrepreneurs, as other business subreddits tend to be almost completely tech focused. We want to have equal discussions on all new businesses ideas, which operate online and offline. We welcome all discussions that would help new businesses.
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Laptop Deals

A place to share deals & special sales on laptops and laptop related accessories.
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The question your online money making with picmoney

For the last couple of months, Google Adsense has dominated forums, discussions and newsletters all over the Internet. Already, there are tales of fabulous riches to be made and millions made by those who are just working from home. It seems that Google Adsense have already dominated the internet marketing business and is now considered the easiest way to making money online.
The key to success with Adsense is the placing of ads on pages that are receiving high traffic for high demand keywords. The higher the cost-per-click to the advertiser, the more you will receive per click from your site. Obviously, it does not pay to target low cost-per-click keywords and place them on pages that do not receive hits.
With all the people getting online and clicking away everyday, it is no wonder why Google Adsense has become an instant hit.
For some who are just new to this market, it would be a blow to their pride knowing that their homepage is buried somewhere in the little ads promoting other people’s services. But then, when they get the idea that they are actually earning more money that way, all doubts and skepticism is laid to rest.
There are two major, and clever, factors that some successful webmaster and publishers are learning to blend together in order to make money easier using Adsense.
  1. Targeting high traffic pages on your website. If you check on your logs, you will discover that many of your visitors are taking advantage of the free affiliate marketing resources and ebooks that you are offering on your site. In simple words, your ads are working effectively and are generating more clicks. It also means more money for you.
  2. Placing Adsense links on pages that are producing little, or better yet, no profit. By placing Adsense on a free resources page, you will reduce the amount of potential customers being lost to other sites. Tricky, but effective nonetheless.
When learned to work effectively, these two factors are actually a good source of producing a minimal amount of revenue from a high traffic page. Many people are using this strategy to pick up some extra and cash with Adsense. This is also especially rewarding to informational sites that focus their efforts on delivering powerful affiliate link free content to their visitors. Now they can gain a monetary return on their services.
With the many techniques that people are now learning on how to make the easiest money by their Adsense, it is not surprising that Google is trying everything to update and polish their Adsense in order to maintain their good image.
The possibility of adding is 2nd tier in Adsense is not impossible. With all the people spending more time in their Adsense now and still more getting into this line of marketing, there is no doubt about the many new improvements yet to be made. Imagine the smiles on the faces of the webmasters and publishers all around the world if ever they sign up for sub-affiliates and double or even triple the amount that they are already earning. The one particularly handy money-making feature that is available with Adsense now is the ability to filter out up to 200 urls. These gives webmasters the option to block out low value offers from their pages as well as competitors to their websites. Talk about taking only those that are advantageous and discarding the ones that seem “useless”.
With Google Adsense, the possibilities are limitless. Yet there is also the possibility of someone taking advantage of the easy money process that this internet marketing is doing. If you think more about it, these negative factors may force Google to break down and thrash Adsense in the process. If that happens, people would have to go back to the old ways of internet marketing that does not make money online as easy as Adsense.
For now, however, Google Adsense is here to stay. As long as there are people wanting to earn some easy cash online just using their talents, the future ahead is looking good. Besides with all the strict guidelines that Google is enforcing over Adsense, it will take awhile for the Adsense privileges to be spammed and even terminated.
If you need full Google adsense coverage and google adsense package then you must go to adsenselover.com or if you need one legitimate online money making concept on internet then have a look at picmoney.com these are the real money making techniques over the internet. People are fulfilling their dreams with these both adsenselover and picmoney sites. http://forexmarket.site/news-66-network-marketing-why.html
submitted by Giuelith to WealthClub [link] [comments]

44 of the Best Affiliate Marketing Tools, Programs, and Resources for 2019 (Free and Paid) | KyLeads

44 of the Best Affiliate Marketing Tools, Programs, and Resources for 2019 (Free and Paid) | KyLeads submitted by mentoringwithjeff to u/mentoringwithjeff [link] [comments]

Any up-to-date free "Free Traffic Source" based affiliate marketing resources?

Charles Ngo has an absolutely brilliant up-to-date free guide on how to do Affiliate Marketing using Paid Sources. Like literally if I wanted to do paid traffic source based AM, I don't have to look anywhere else, he has a full fledged guide that's as good (if not better) than a paid guide!
On the free traffic source based space though (niche/authority sites relying on SEO etc.), I am yet to find one like this.
There's loads of scattered resources on many websites but many are just fluff and are wanting you to buy their paid training.
Now I've been lurking on this sub for a while now, and I noticed that many of you say don't buy a product as it's all available for free online. But I end up getting outdated/conflicting information from difference sources. For example I have heard people saying not to go into competitive niches and I've heard others saying do what you love even if it's competitive. I'm sure both are sound advice but as a Newbie to all this it makes it tough for me to deal with lots of scattered information. Another annoying thing is that some people say you should focus on easy to rank niche sites (so small sites with just a few articles but will keep giving you passive income) but others say those don't work anymore you need to have authority based websites.
Furthermore, many of the big names in this space (eg. John Chow) mostly make money selling 'make money online' training courses! I have no idea how much up-to-date knowledge they actually have on how to do Affiliate Marketing using Free Traffic Sources these days from scratch as they're not even doing that anymore!
I have already bought a domain, set up hosting, and started posting articles with some tips I picked up but gosh it would be awesome if there was a Charles Ngo based figure that had loads of up-to-date information on how to do this and their main income source was Free Traffic Source based Affiliate Marketing websites.
Sorry for the massive post but hope I can get some great info from some of you on really good up-to-date resources on Free Traffic based Affiliate Marketing! Thanks in advance :)
submitted by dabrainstabber to AffiliateMarket [link] [comments]

Subscribe and Get Latest Updates of Earn Money Online, Youtube, Facebook, Affiliate Marketing Tools, Free Resources, HTML & CSS Tricks, Website Design & Development, Wordpress, SEO, SOcial Media Marketing & Blogging.

Subscribe and Get Latest Updates of Earn Money Online, Youtube, Facebook, Affiliate Marketing Tools, Free Resources, HTML & CSS Tricks, Website Design & Development, Wordpress, SEO, SOcial Media Marketing & Blogging. submitted by anantvijaysoni to u/anantvijaysoni [link] [comments]

Stop Hate for Profit: Peloton spends 76% of their marketing budget on Facebook, while 180+ companies are quitting the platform over hate speech. Why won't Peloton join the boycott?

It's time Peloton quits Facebook #StopHateForProfit

180+ Companies are boycotting Facebook; Peloton isn't.

In the past week major brands - Verizon, Adidas, Unilever, Honda, and Hershey’s - to name a few - joined a global boycott of advertising on Facebook. They join a list of over 180 companies agreeing to "Hit Pause on Hate," (some are listed here) by not advertising on Facebook in the month of July. The boycott has been organized by the Anti-Defamation League, Color of Change, the Free Press, Common Sense, the NAACP, and Sleeping Giants - to name a few.
The goal is to send Facebook a powerful message: Your profits will never be worth promoting hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism, and violence. Facebook took $70 billion in ad dollars; but did you realize it's the ONLY social media platform Peloton officially recognizes? Peloton spent 76% of their marketing budget there from 11/16/2018 - 12/15/19! Peloton has heavily advertised on FB - and promoted the platform - for years. Marketing efforts have long been led by Carolyn Tisch Blodgett and “community” efforts led and overseen by Jayvee Nava. While many of you were pointing out the longstanding toxic environment of their Facebook page, Peloton still left it largely unmoderated. Even going so far as patting themselves on the back with a “200k strong” badge, and bragging about it multiple times on their public blog. They push users to Facebook via links on every page of their website; its mentioned 92 times on the company blog; in every email from John Foley; and on the bike, Tread, and apps pop-ups encourage users to sign up for Facebook accounts and link their Peloton login. Peloton doesn't just advertise on FB, they actively encourage users participate there.
Peloton spent $324 million on marketing - 35% of sales - in the 12 months ended June 2019. With 76% dedicated to Facebook, that's $246.24 million.
Let’s put that $246.24 million into perspective. Money spent on a platform promoting hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism and violence. What would that money buy? It's 6,313,846 monthly subscriptions, or 109,684 bikes, or 57,332 Treads, or 5 brand new studios, or 4.5x their entire annual R&D budget, or 15x their music costs. Strikingly, just one-month ago - weeks after protests began - Peloton pledged $500k to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, even while continuing their Facebook presence.
Over the years that Peloton has been relying on Facebook as its sole community platform and major advertising partner, Facebook has used Peloton's money by:

What could Peloton have accomplished with that same $246.24 million?

Facebook could protect and support Black users. They could call out Holocaust denial as hate. They could help get out the vote. But they are actively choosing not to do so. 99% of Facebook’s $70 billion is made through advertising. Meanwhile, Peloton has been dedicating 76% of its marketing spend on Facebook. Here's some examples. They're in the top-five spenders of direct-to-consumer brands. Peloton could send a very direct message here, but their silence is deafening. Not only are they NOT taking a stand, they continue to send messages to all subscribers asking them to become users at Facebook, further increasing Facebook ad revenue.

It's time we asked Peloton to stop standing with Facebook; stop advertising there; stop running their only "official" page on a platform promoting hate and violence. It's time Peloton put its corporate money - our subscription dollars - toward a platform that does not promote hate speech, racism, bigotry, antisemitism, and violence.

Helpful Links

A bit about PelotonCycle

For anyone who wasn't aware, /PelotonCycle was started-by and is run by-and-for Peloton members. We are not affiliated with Peloton Interactive. We started in 2015 with the goal of elevating the Peloton conversation. We seek to exchange info, ideas, intel about Peloton; selflessly helping each other become better athletes and people. Over the years we've seen members do some amazing things, including create the BlueHeart app, and start a monthly cycling challenge that became what we now know as Monthly Challenges. A bot was created here from scratch which tags your Leaderboard name - and keeps your achievements updated 4x/day. We celebrate Milestones every Monday; including those streaks and achievements that Peloton doesn't recognize. On most days, I see threads full of people selflessly helping each other out of the goodness of their hearts. In my view, that's the very spirit of sport.
What you, yes you - the person reading this - and the others around you have built, over years, has helped countless people. We don't publicly post our traffic, because we're really more focused on helping each other and don’t feel the need to emphasize subscribers as the sole marker of a successful community. But over 900,000 people visit here in a given month. Over 4 million unique pageviews. In May 2020 alone you posted 1,096 threads with a combined 24,983 comments. The vast majority were detailed, helpful, informative, interesting, value-added info you generously shared with your fellow members out of the goodness of your heart.
As always, keeping our rules enforced fairly and evenhandedly, and generally running this massive place, would be an impossible endeavour if not for FrauKoko and Kraphtyone. We owe a big thanks to NCBarkingDogs who spends countless hours keeping the bot's gears greased.

What Reddit is doing

You may have seen the news Reddit's sitewide owners have banned a number of communities, added a Black board member, and updated their content policy. If you don't know reddit's sitewide rules, they're worth checking out here.
Here in /PelotonCycle we have always maintained a stricter set of rules, including "be kind" (R2), "criticism is welcomed, but don't use it as an excuse to push an agenda" (R6), and a broad view (R7) that "personal attacks, slurs, or comments that insult or demean a specific user or group of users" is inappropriate, considered spam, the content will be removed and you may be banned without warning. We have for a while now been banning links to Facebook or removing content that promotes FOMO when discussing Peloton on FB. More on that policy here.

Wrap Up: What can I do?

Someone recently asked me, "what can I do to help?" and my answer is: a) use the vote buttons, and b) click "report" on anything you feel is rule-breaking.
We're community-run. Meaning, your votes move content up/down the page. If it shouldn't be seen, downvote it. If more people should see it, upvote it. If it's rule-breaking -- that goes for any post or any comment, click the "report" button. That immediately sends a 100% anonymous alert to a shared moderator inbox and allows us to act on inappropriate content quickly. If you have an issue with a specific mod, please let me know. If you have an issue with me (and don't want to PM me), please let another mod know. None of us make money off this place; none of us have ever made a single penny here. We endeavour to fairly and evenhandedly enforce our rules. We endeavour to promote a place that's open, transparent, informative, fun, helpful. A place you can make friends, laugh, relax, share stories and info. A place you can interact while being as anonymous as you like (a reddit account doesn't require your real name or even an email, for example); we value user privacy here. We value honesty, integrity, fairness, generosity, fresh ideas, open debate. I'm really proud of what you all have built here. We seek to be better -- better athletes, better people.
Beyond improving this specific Peloton community for all humans, it is time we asked the same of Peloton, too. It's long, long overdue for Peloton to step away from Facebook, build worthwhile community features into their own app/website/platform. To be clear, we are not asking Peloton to take over this page. This is not a self-serving call to action. It is asking Peloton to stop promoting hate by choosing to use Facebook as its social platform; by choosing to spend an overwhelming portion of its astronomical budget on Facebook advertising; asking Peloton to stop giving lip service to community, and start investing real $’s and resources into building the same “community” features that FitBit, Garmin, Suunto, and other platforms have created. Into their own ecosystem. Their own website, apps, hardware.

Put simply: Peloton, stop promoting hate by spending money on Facebook. You can share your support by emailing [email protected], up-voting this post, and leaving a comment below.

submitted by ClipIn to pelotoncycle [link] [comments]

Updated list of Global Beermoney opportunities (+180!) - June 2020

Updated list of Global Beermoney opportunities (+180!) - June 2020

Introduction

The current, and now previous, Beermoney Global list started nearly 5 years ago. It’s been updated and has grown over all that time, but it also became a hassle to keep current. It was time to build a new list from scratch based on my experience in the Beermoney world over all these years and all the contributions all of you have been making in this sub.
The lists consist of opportunities that are available in at least one country that is not the US. This means there are sites which only work in Canada or the UK. There’s sites which are open to the whole world, but this does not mean everyone can really earn something on it. It’s all still very demographic and therefore location dependent. This list should give you a starting point to try out and find what works for you. I’m not using everything myself as I prefer to focus on a few, so not all are tested by me. They are found in this sub, other subreddits and other resources where people claim to have success.
I’ve chosen the format of a simple table with the bare minimum of information to keep things clean. It includes a link, how you earn, personal payment proof if available and sign-up bonus codes if applicable. Some of these bonuses are also one-time use codes specifically made for this sub! For the ones I don’t have payment proof (yet) feel free to provide some as a comment or via modmail so others know it’s legit. I am working on detailed instructions for each method that I personally use which will include things like cashout minimum, cashout options, tips & tricks,... For now I’ve split things up based on the type of earning like passive or mobile. Because of this there’s sometimes an overlap as some are both passive and on mobile or both earning crypto and a GPT (Get Paid To) website.
The lists are obviously not complete so I invite you to keep posting new ones in the sub, as a comment to this post, or in modmail. Especially if you have sites or apps which work for one single specific country I can start building a list, just like I did for The Netherlands and Belgium. If you recognize things which are in fact scams or not worth it let me know as well.

Beermoney opportunities

Get Paid To (Surveys, tasks, offers, videos, clicking links, play games, searching)
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
ySense - The best global site Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Paypal /
PrizeRebel Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Paypal Enter code 'beermoneyglobal'
SerpClix Google searching Paypal /
Swagbucks & SwagButton Surveys, tasks, offers, videos, shopping & cashback, games, apps Paypal /
GG2U Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Pending $1.00 if register here
Keep Rewarding Surveys, tasks, offers, videos, PTC Pending $0.25 if register here
Ebesucher Surfing, reading mails Bank transfer /
Reward XP Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Pending $0.50 if register here
Gain.gg Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Paypal $0.10 if register here
Timebucks Surveys, tasks, offers, videos, Tik Tok, Shopping Pending $1.00 if register here
GamerMine Surveys, offers, videos, tasks, Pending $1.00 if register here
Gamehag Tasks, offers, play games, post on forum, writing Pending /
BTCSurveys Surveys Pending /
FruitLab Watch & upload video game clips Pending 100 pips if register here
Clickworker Transcripts, tasks, UHRS (categorizing), surveys Paypal /
FreeSkins Surveys, offers, tasks, videos Pending 100 coins if register here
iRazoo Games, surveys, videos, offers, apps Pending Enter code 'AK7DB2' for 500 points when signing up
EarnCrypto Data entry, surveys, offers, tasks, videos, games, apps Pending /
Blockreward Apps, surveys, videos, tasks, offers Pending $2.00 if register here and earn 20000b + $2.00 if earn 10000b within 30 days
PaidViewPoint Surveys Pending /
GrabPoints Suverys, videos, offers, games, apps Pending 500 points if register here
RewardingWays Surveys, offers, tasks, videos, contests Pending $0.20 if register here
SuperPay Surveys, offers, tasks, videos, contests Pending $0.20 if register here
InstaGC Surveys, tasks, videos, apps Pending /
GiftHunterClub Surveys, offers, videos, apps, games Pending $0.75 if register here
Idle-Empire Surveys, offers, videos, mining, apps, games Pending 500 points if register here
PicoWorkers Tasks, games, apps Pending /
ViewFruit Surveys Pending /
Mobrog (change language if needed) Surveys Pending /
Surveytime Surveys Pending /
Giveaway Pros Offers, videos Pending /
SEO Sprint (Russian, use Google Translate) Tasks Pending /
Earnhoney Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Pending /
Toluna Surveys Pending /
Spidermetrix Surveys Pending /
BeerSurveys Surveys, tasks, offers Pending /
CrowdHolding Co-create with startups Pending /
Diaworkers Tasks Pending /
Presearch Search & Earn Pending /
Univox Community Surveys Pending /
YouGov Surveys Pending /
Spare5 Tasks Paypal /
Rewardia Surveys, polls, games, videos, puzzles, trivia Pending 3000 points extra (when you earn 3000 points) if register here
Earnably Surveys, tasks, offers, videos Pending /
Neevo Tasks Pending /
Rakuten Insight (country specific links) Surveys Pending /
The Panel Station Surveys Pending /
Remotasks Tasks Pending /
Pureprofile Surveys Pending /
UserCrowd Tasks PayPal /
Sruvey Village Surveys Pending /
InboxDollars/InboxPounds Surveys, offers, videos, shopping Pending /
Qmee Surveys Pending /
MicroWorkers Tasks Pending /
Cinchbucks Surveys, offers, tasks, videos Pending /
Rewards1 Suverys, videos, offers, games, apps, polls, contests Pending /
Vindale Surveys Pending /
PointClub Surveys Pending /
TGM Panel Surveys Pending /
PaidPoints Tasks, offers, traffic exchange, ad clicking Pending /
RapidWorkers Tasks Pending /
AnyTask Sell your skills Pending /
Bounty0x Tasks Pending /
Opinion World Surveys Pending /
Lifepoints Surveys Pending /
Passive (desktop & mobile)
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
HoneyGain Desktop & mobile phone bandwith sharing (wifi + data) Paypal $5.00 if register here
FluidStack Desktop bandwith sharing (Linux needed) Paypal /
PacketStream Desktop bandwith sharing Pending /
LoadTeam CPU power sharing Pending $0.20 if register here
Gener8 Browser extension Pending 10 tokens if register here
Kryptex Crypto mining Pending /
Ebesucher Surfing, reading mails Bank transfer /
Honeyminer Mining Pending 1000 satoshis if register here
LazyBucks Rent out your Facebook account Pending /
HideoutTV and link to Reward XP to cashout Videos Pending /
Honey Discounts & Cashback / 500 Honey Gold if register here
Fitplay Games Pending $0.33 if register here
Mistplay Games Pending /
Money SMS Receive SMS Pending /
McMoney Receive SMS Pending $0.22 if using code '60LGG3PR'
SMS Profit Net Receive SMS Pending /
Simcash Send SMS [risky] Pending /
Cash4sms Send [risky] & receive SMS Pending /
ControlMySMS Receive SMS Pending /
Birdchain Send SMS [risky] Pending /
Sweatcoin Walking Pending /
COIN Explore Pending 1000 coins if register here
Panel App Surveys, location sharing Pending /
Phoneum Games, mining Pending /
Crypto (faucets, mining, GPT)
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Cointiply Faucet, surveys, tasks, offers, videos Bitcoin Enter code 'beermoneyglobal'
FreeBitcoin Faucet, lottery, betting, passive interest Bitcoin /
AdBTC Click ads, active window surfing, autosurfing Pending /
Faucetpay Faucet Wallet, exchange, offers, tasks, trading Pending /
Faucet Crypto Faucet, ads clicking, offers, shortlinks Pending /
More Money Faucet, ads clicking, offers, shortlinks Pending /
Kryptex Crypto mining Pending /
Quicrypto Surveys, tasks, offers, games, videos Pending /
Coinpot Faucet Bitcoin /
Honeyminer Mining Pending 1000 satoshis if register here
BitShark Faucet, games Pending /
Publish0x Read & write articles Pending /
Starbits Faucet (need FaucetPay account) Pending /
Coinpayu Ads clicking, videos, offers Pending /
BTCSurveys Surveys Pending /
Blockreward Apps, surveys, videos Pending $2.00 if register here and earn 20000b + $2.00 if earn 10000b within 30 days
Coinbase Crypto sign-up bonuses Bank transfer See links in thread
LBRY.tv Watch videos Pending /
Pi Network Crypto mining Pending (see here) To join you need a referral link
EarnCrypto Data entry, surveys, offers, tasks, videos, games, apps Pending /
Phoneum Games, mining Pending /
Mobile
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Cointiply Faucet, surveys, tasks, offers, videos Bitcoin Enter code 'beermoneyglobal'
HoneyGain Desktop & mobile phone bandwith sharing (wifi + data) Paypal $5.00 if register here
Google Opinion Rewards Surveys Play Store credit /
FreeBitcoin Faucet, lottery, betting, passive interest Bitcoin /
AppKarma Games, quizes, surveys Pending Enter code 'Proim' for 300 points when signing up
CashKarma Surveys, offers, games Pending Enter code 'Proim' for 300 points when signing up
Cash Alarm Games Pending Receive 25% of my earnings if register here
Cash Magnet Games, offers, tasks, videos Pending /
AttaPoll Surveys Pending /
ClipClaps Videos, games, raffles PayPall $1.00 & Diamond Chest if register here
Quicrypto Surveys, tasks, offers, games, videos Pending /
Poll Pay Surveys Pending $0.30 if using code '4CS6L4SQ8D' when signing up
BuzzBreak Read news, videos, offers, surveys Pending Enter code 'B06472489' when signing up
Userlytics Software testing Pending /
WowApp Games, offers, surveys, videos, chat, phone unlock, calling, cashback, shopping cashback, browsing, news reading Pending /
CuriousCat Surveys Pending /
Quickthoughts Surveys Pending /
Fitplay Games Pending $0.33 if register here
TV-Two Make Money Apps, games, Youtube, browsing Pending 555 credits if register here
Mistplay Games Pending /
FeaturePoints Suveys, offers, apps, cashback Pending 50 points if register here
Money SMS Receive SMS Pending /
BIGtoken Suveys, location sharing, social media account Pending Use code 'GMGALLOIA'
McMoney Receive SMS Pending $0.22 if using code '60LGG3PR'
Pi Network Crypto mining Pending (see here) To join you need a referral link
Roamler Mystery shopping Pending /
SMS Profit Net Receive SMS Pending /
Streetbees Surveys, tasks, create videos, take pictures Pending Enter code '6115GF' when signing up
Simcash Send SMS [risky] Pending /
VoxPopMe Video feedback Pending /
Cash4sms Send [risky] & receive SMS Pending /
Citizen Me Surveys Pending /
ControlMySMS Receive SMS Pending /
Birdchain Send SMS [risky] Pending /
Sweatcoin Walking Pending /
COIN Explore Pending 1000 coins if register here
Panel App Surveys, location sharing Pending /
GiftHunterClub Surveys, offers, videos, apps, games Pending $0.75 if register here
Phoneum Games, mining Pending /
Research
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Respondent Interviews, research, surveys Pending /
Prolific Surveys, research Paypal /
User testing
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
TestingTime Software testing Pending /
uTest Software testing Pending /
PingPong Software testing Pending /
TryMyUI Software/UI testing Pending /
Testbirds Software/UI testing Pending /
Pulselabs Voice app testing Pending /
PlaytestCloud Game testing Pending /
Userlytics Software testing Pending /
Investing (revenue share)
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
PaidVerts Ad clicking, offers, revenue sharing Bitcoin /
MyTrafficValue Games, investing PayPal /
Selling (designs on merchandise, skills/gigs)
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Fiverr Sell your skills Pending 20% off on first purchase if register here
Redbubble Sell your designs Pending /
Zeerk Sell your skills Pending /
TeePublic Sell your designs Pending /
Teespring Sell your designs Pending /
Transcribing/Translating
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Rev Transcribing, captioning, foreign subtitles Pending /
Gotranscript Transcribing, translating captioning, foreign subtitles Pending /
TranscribeMe Transcribing, translating, data annotation Pending /
Unbabel Translating Pending /
Others
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Wealthy Affiliate Learn affiliate marketing Pending /
Brave Brows internet Pending /
Andromo Develop apps Pending /
The Netherlands specific
For The Netherlands there are a few very good options next to a bunch of ‘spaarprogramma’s. There ‘spaarprogramma’s are all the same where you receive and click a bunch of e-mails, advertisements, banners,... I advise you to create a separate e-mail address or use a good filter in your inbox as you will be spammed to death. I believe they can be a nice piece of beermoney but they take quite the effort.
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
Euroclix Surveys, shopping & cashback, offers, energy/internet providers Bank transfer €1.95 if register here
StemPunt Surveys Gift cards 500 points if register here
Cashback XL Shopping cashback, health insurance discount Bank transfer /
Scoupy Shopping cashback, free products Pending /
Cashback Korting Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €7.50 if register here
Lady Cashback Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €7.50 if register here
Enqueteclub Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €7.50 if register here
Snel Verdienen Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €2.50 if register here
Spaar Actief Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €1.00 if register here
Klik Je Zakgeld Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €1.00 if register here
Zinngeld Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €0.10 if register here
My Clics Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €1.25 if register here
Direct Verdiend Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €2.00 if register here
Spaar4Cash Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending €1.50 if register here
Qassa Read mails, click banners, shopping cashback, shopping deals, compare (GWL, data, internet, tv, insurances), offers, surveys Pending /
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Belgium specific
Register here How to earn Payment proof Sign-up bonus code
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The one-time sign-up bonus programs are still to be found here. If you find a new one let me know so I can create the post to keep all the ref links together.

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Although it’s not really about making money online, it’s still nice to save some money as well when shopping online.
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Other subs & resources

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Three weeks without wife and kid to learn Affiliate Marketing

Here I am, I just dropped off my wife and little kid at the airport for holidays at grand-parents for three weeks.
I’m still WFH and it is a perfect timing to get into Affiliate marketing.
I would like to go through the whole process without being particularly profitable. This will come later eventually.
Where should I start ?
I have decent savings to cover eventual costs. I am not closed to spending money in a training although I understood that it was not that important. There should be good resources for free I guess. At least to start.
Here is my background : I’m an IT engineer (Databases) working as a contractor in Europe (currently Switzerland). No experience in Sales, Marketing. I understand accountancy. Otherwise pretty only IT.
I have no diploma, I have always learnt by myself from one opportunity to another so I am quite confident in my ability to acquire whatever level of knowledge that is required.
I learn by doing so please tell me what to do.
Thank you all
submitted by mx_bzh to Affiliatemarketing [link] [comments]

Med School: Why and why not Ateneo School of Medicine and Public Health (ASMPH) — an honest review

Hi! I have been sneaking around Reddit and Twitter for a few days now, and most threads that I saw are queries about comparing ASMPH to other med schools and seeing which one is “better”. In my personal and humble opinion, I would like to believe that there is no “best med school”; rather, I’d like to think that there is a “best med school for you”. This means that each medical school does things in very different and distinct ways, and it might be up to you if these distinctions or how they run the school would be preferential to you.
So in light of this, I’d like to share the pros and cons of what it means to be an ASMPH student. Just to be clear: 1) I am an ASMPH graduate and a medical doctor, 2) I think fondly of my time in school, 3) I am not paid to promote ASMPH in any way, and 4) there are some things in the school that I do not like (compared at least to the other posts that I saw which zealously ”defend” the school lol). I will be brutally honest and sincere about my review, so my advance apologies to readers who will find some comments “radical”. I made this thread with my own efforts to dispel (more of KILL) misperceptions hounding my school for a long time: “being babied”, “spoiled”, ”hindi naman magaling sa clinicals”, and etc.
To clarify, I am using my own experiences from my time as a student, and as this thread will age, some of the things written here might not be true anymore the older this gets (hence, future ASMPH students are welcome to contribute their experiences by commenting below!).

Why ASMPH? (PROS)

Strong helping culture
Traditionally, medical schools emphasize the virtues of “excellence” that got misinterpreted (by some weird reason) into the lines of the Machiavellian principle: “Only the strongest will survive”. Hence, you may hear the usual med school horror stories of “fierce competition”, ”I will fail you all”, and “do it all by yourself”. I am glad that I have not encountered these horrors, because the school has designed a system which cultivates helping each other thrive. There is the mentorship program, in which doctor-mentors help students identify their strengths and weaknesses in their medical training, and work on it. The “Pugad Agila” organization is there to support not just the board takers who are preparing for their board exams, but the students themselves in preparing for major examinations. Believe it or not, people in the school are seemingly ”transformed” to help one another: in my time, all the med students who are PTs (physical therapists) made extra review classes for Anatomy, the nurses bonded together to create mini modules for Physical Exam, the Med techs will teach extra classes of Pathology and Microbiology, and the RPharma will give classes of Pharmacology to students for free. The ones which had rigorous backgrounds of Epidemiology will offer classes to students who are not exposed to the Public Health Sciences concepts. Even the registered (bio)chemists will lecture Biochem and try as best as they can to make the concepts more understandable and student-friendly! The older generations of ASMPH students also generously would “pass on” their lecture transcripts of years’ worth of lectures to the new generations of students who will come in, and no one is spared from this generosity (compared to other med schools which are preferential, let us say, to their frat or sorority members). This culture of helping each other out regardless of anything and everything, I think, is the greatest pro that ASMPH has to offer, and I think that so far, no other med school has emphasized this as their core strength (others would emphasize a “long tradition of excellence”, “reputation”, etc). I strongly think that this culture of helping, togetherness, and unity is what is needed in our health organizations especially in the Philippines, which by far are obviously swamped by partisan politicking, “power-tripping”, and blame-throwing — a culture which MIGHT have origins from the subcultures cultivated in traditional med schools.
I also have to add here that some students who do not perform well/score low in examinations are treated not with rejection (compared I think to other med schools who are more than happy to kick out underperforming students), but with extra support from the admin and the student body. The school recognizes the value of its students and not just based on their performance or grades alone. Review classes held by better-performing students are held for free in light of removal exam weeks for students who needed them. This however does not mean that the school would deliberately lower its standards by making the exams easier for students to pass. However, the school recognizes that there are many factors that determine a student’s ability to perform well in examinations (e.g. mental health, financial issues, others), and it does try to strive in eliminating negative factors that hinder a student from performing well academically.
Rigorous Academic Curriculum in Basic + Clinical Sciences AND Working Feedback Mechanism
I have to say that the curriculum presented by the school is very rigorous in structure and in application, and it is very flexible and adaptive. Each module has been integrated into Systems, which really facilitates relatively easier learning since you can already apply your concepts from Anatomy to Physiology, or Pharmacology to Pathology (because the subjects are grouped together in a systems fashion). Aside from the weekly major exams (more or less), there are other avenues of learning as well like the Student Group Discussions (SGDs), where students are given a case to analyze and discuss, and the (in)famous Team Based Learning (TBLs), in which the students are given multiple extra readings from various CPGs and resources on top of the lectures, then solve a case right in front of the preceptor and take quizzes. Each subject is taught by different professors who are experts in their own fields, and more often than not, no single professor handles more than one lecture per module, which makes examinations more challenging (since no patterns of how questions are asked and what questions are asked can be established), hence making this a very effective ground of ensuring that the curriculum is rigorous in itself. However, others argue that this might disrupt the flow of repeating information in a spaced out fashion (which is necessary for true retention btw), and perhaps lumping related information into one module will deplete opportunities for certain information to be repeated in shorter periods, making it harder to remember in a long-term manner (ex: lumping Biochem altogether in the first part of First year Med will make it harder for the Atenean Board Taker (5th year Med) to recall Biochem concepts because these are not frequently revisited due to the Modular Set-up).
In the Clinical Sciences (Clerkship and Internship), there were some hits and misses in the training at least in my time. But overall, I think that it was great that we were exposed to both the Private and Public Health institutions, because both function differently. In the private setting, we were able to learn ideal management (since our patients do not have financial constraints) and observe topnotch, highly-respected physicians on how they practice their bedside manners and deal with cases involving with very high profile patients. Contrary to popular belief that students are not allowed to handle patients in private hospital settings, we actually do handle a LOT (the school’s partner hospital hosts the LARGEST amount of patients seen nationwide in the ER setting, private hospital-wise) and do it first-hand (especially in the Emergency Room and in the Internal Medicine Wards). In the public hospital setting, we are also first-line in terms of dealing with patients (e.g. history-taking, clinical skills, IV insertions, Foley insertions, ECG interpretation, delivering babies and suturing perineums). On top of these responsibilities and shadowing physicians, we are required to meet with selected faculty and staff and present case discussions on a regular basis in order to reinforce our learning. The beauty of being exposed on both private and public fields, however, is when you are forced to innovate your knowledge from the private setting and adjust it to the public health management, or when you bring your adeptness in your clinical skills acquired from the public health arena to the private health institution. In a way, both health systems benefit from your respective exposures, and you gain a holistic insight on how to deal with patients ranging from the richest of the rich to the poorest of the poor.
Furthermore, we were tasked to assist our residents and consultants to help in accomplishing numerous paperwork properly (tons and tons of them!), the basic framework and the most important cornerstone of hospital practice, for without it (or it being deficient or substandard), the practice of the consultant, the resident, and subsequently the medical student, will be highly endangered (read: medical lawsuits).
The feedback mechanism, despite it being taxing and hassle for most students, is absolutely necessary for the curriculum to be improved. In my batch at least, we were able to kick out (seriously) profs we felt that were not lecturing well enough, which I think is something that other med schools do not have. We also had our share of bad doctor-profs who just read from their lecture slides and (worse) copy some of their slides from online lectures — but the feedback mechanism successfully weeded them out, which (I hope) encourages most of our profs to make sure that their lectures are good (and worth the tuition we paid).
Insanely supportive Faculty
The core faculty of the school, despite being heavily decorated (eg. presidents of their affiliate specialties, numerous recognitions and awards), are very supportive of the student body, and are OPEN to subjective criticism and feedback, which I think is not that present in other med schools (MDs from other med schools are more than welcome to disagree!). I remember this incident wherein our batch decided to write a letter and express our negative sentiments towards a certain module (will not say what because this will provide a clue to which batch I belong to haha), and instead of venting their ire to the students, they proposed a meeting where we can discuss our grievances and suggestions without any fear of any forms of retaliation. Another incident would be when a classmate of mine proposed a change of dress code for graduation wherein students should be allowed to wear whatever they are comfortable with as long as it is decent (i.e. not limiting women’s clothing to dresses), which was supported by the administration. I have not heard of such degree of freedom in any other med school, which is why I laud our faculty for their efforts to be open and inclusive.

Why NOT ASMPH? (CONS)

No Labor Payment (at all) regardless of Hospital Setting
Whereas other interns earn (albeit minimally but still) allowances or stipends, ASMPH interns do NOT earn anything despite doing labor-intensive work inside the hospital. The partner institutions tend to justify and rationalize this treatment as “deserving“ for trainees (e.g. not just for medical students but for residents and fellows as well, who receive bare minimal salaries in the private setting) because the skills and clinical acumen that will be gained in training is deemed to be “sufficient compensation”, but I beg to differ and disagree. The amount of time and labor spent by medical trainees (regardless of being a medical student or a fellow) inside the hospital SHOULD be reflective on the amount of compensation (or hazard pay) that the hospital administration should give, since it is but fair and just labor. I would argue that hospitals, especially ASMPH’s partner institution, The Medical City (TMC), have the capacity to subsidize its trainees well because a) most of them are tertiary, profitable, top-earning hospitals in the country, b) Medical trainees run the hospital and make it alive, sacrificing more and doing more than the consultants, wherein some (not all, to be fair) usually just claim their slice of the pie, and c) Medical trainees are solely responsible for managing health data of all patients, which should ideally be managed by everyone involved in the set-up. To add salt to these wounds, an intern (medical trainee) from a hospital abroad who does only 8 hour shifts earns at least $170 (est PhP 8,000) PER DAY (source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZijqVV1NqYQ) compared to an ASMPH intern who earns NOTHING in 24 hour shifts, and subsequently compared to an average Philippine Medical Intern who earns PhP 5,000 - 7,000 allowance PER MONTH. Older MDs would dismiss this and might call this as “demanding” and “typical of millenial mentality”; I would call this as it is and would like to request for some form of justice. Most hospital administrators, or I daresay the investors of healthcare system who are mostly businessmen and are non healthcare professionals, are more than willing to opportunistically abuse the willingness of medical trainees (not just doctors, but nurses, midwives, etc.) to improve their training with minimal or no compensation, because this is what is tagged as “most profitable” or “minimal cost” for most companies in a business perspective. Others would argue that ”the time of the young doctors to earn and reap their rewards will come when they become consultants”, but I will ask: what if that time will never come? I think of all the medical trainees who valiantly suffered and died in the battlefield because of COVID-19 — their supposed promised reaping of reward, even hazard pay, never came.
However, I would like to point out that this issue does not concern ASMPH solely, but involves the partner institutions in which it is affiliated. Furthermore, this problem of labor exploitation is not exclusive to ASMPH’s partner institution (although I would argue that we feel it more since we technically receive nothing — MDs from St. Luke’s please help me out), but rampant in hospitals that belong to the Philippine Health Care system in general.
Note: I would have inserted exorbitant tuition fees here, but it would not have contributed that much significantly to the discussion since all non-state sponsored medical schools have more or less the same tuition fees. The only difference is that ASMPH still pays tuition during its Internship year (along with St. Luke’s), partly because of the Professors that still give lectures and examine case presentations, and for the Boards Review (hence the reason why Ateneans have their own exclusive section for the PLE Boards Review Season — which is honestly a big, big Pro)
MBA: Friend or Foe?
Most students from other universities would comment that the MBA component was added in the spirit of “profitability” and learning more refined ways on how to earn more — and was tagged and branded as counterintuitive to the nobility that a medical doctor is supposed to possess (I am looking at you, selected students from UP 🙃). However, I would like to clarify that the MBA was crafted in order for us future physicians to be adept in managing health systems and organizations, which would undeniably involve financial management (eg. how would you manage a hospital’s finances and allot budget to medical equipment?), strategic management (eg. given the COVID-19 situation, how will your outpatient clinic sustain operations in the next 5 months?), and marketing management (eg. given that everyone is scared to go outside their homes, how would you market your hospital to be safe from COVID-19?). In an ideal set-up, these concepts and exercises should guide the med student thoroughly on how to apply all of these in the medical setting.
The main con of the MBA program is that most of its professors (except for maybe two, because both are physicians and MBA holders) and subsequently, their classes, lack exposure in the Medical setting (i.e. Hospital Administration, OPD management, and Public Health Systems Management), and more often than not, most examples that they could provide involve fields other than medicine (eg. banking, economics, construction, advertising). I see this as a con mainly because despite having benefits of seeing how management works on a different lens (hence making you more interdisciplinary in a way), I think that practicing these concepts in the medical field at least in the classroom setting and learning these from someone who is equally adept in both medicine and management would enrich the knowledge and appreciation of how intertwined both of these fields are as a holder of a dual MD-MBA degree, and not a haphazardly constructed, disjointed one. Furthermore, there are concepts in MBA which makes sense in a corporate setting but might be unethical or unacceptable in the realm of Health (eg. sacrificing quality of health care access for patients in order to invest less assets and accumulate more profit). Therefore, it would be up to the student to apply these concepts on his/her own. Thankfully, students may have the opportunity to apply all of these concepts and skills once they make their Final Strategic Management Thesis Paper, because you may opt to select any field you like to study on. In my case, I was lucky to have gotten a hospital as my focus-subject, therefore I managed to learn about Hospital systems and management on top of the MBA concepts that I learned. Hopefully, with new batches of MD-MBAs that are being produced, this con could be changed by the school in due time.
A definite con during my time (which was thankfully changed, thanks to feedback!) was having MBA classes despite being from hospital duty (which meant no sleep but we still had to endure classes) — that was one of the most unproductive classes of my life and I never wanted to go through any of that ever again (I still passed the subject, but I really never gauged if I learned well).
Public Health: Lacking or Sufficient?
This section might be of great concern to those who are looking forward to exploring ASMPH as an arena for expanding their Public Health skills (hello, Health Sci majors!). At this point, I need to disclose that I was a Health Sciences Major myself who had a decent fluency in Public Health (Basic Epidemiology and Global Health) prior to entering ASMPH, and I know some classmates of mine back in college (especially those who took Health and Developmental Studies) who looked forward in going to ASMPH for more advanced public health courses, only to find themselves disappointed as they went through the curriculum. Some of them eventually quit and went on to pursue Masters in Epidemiology or in Global Health elsewhere. Hence, some students in undergrad might hear swirling hearsay that ASMPH ”lacks the Public Health component or aspect”. This is perhaps mainly due to the fact that most of the lessons and discourse on Public Health in ASMPH, at least when I experienced it, were quite on the basic level — a reiteration of the courses we already went through in college as HSc majors. To be fair to the school, these kinds of discourse and topics are not experienced or tackled by people with other Bachelor degrees (eg. BS Psychology, BS Biology, etc.), and hence a repeat of these courses in Med school is deemed necessary to even out the disparity of knowledge among its students. But it would be safe to say that as of this writing (since no announcements have been made yet anyway), ASMPH does NOT offer courses that cater to advanced branches of Public Health such as Advanced Epidemiology (which would involve crazy mathematics such as those being used in monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic), Global Health Surveillance, Global Health Politics, and etc. A query was made about this (hence an open forum), and the reason why this happened is because the school does not have the faculty or the experts to teach the said subjects (so far).
However, this does NOT mean that ASMPH discounts Public Health. The school’s curriculum still satisfies the minimum requirements of what a medical doctor needs to know regarding Public Health (eg. Basic Epidemiology and Statistics, Health Awareness and Communication), and the main thesis paper of ASMPH students during their second and third year has Public Health in its core. The school also established the ASMPH Public Health Council, which is an org that engages Public Health discourse in the school and invites lecturers and key experts to discuss socially relevant Public Health issues. The CEIP program, which is a specialized program designed for medical students interested in managing health in a community setting, was established in hopes of strengthening the Public Health core of the school. However, the need (or should I say, demand) for advanced branches of Public Health subjects still remains, and this is something that the school needs to work on.
Conclusion
So to sum it all up, ASMPH is more or less a good medical school with supportive admin and staff, ”No Atenean Left Behind” culture and conducive learning environment, and a rigorous training program for future medical doctors. Despite its non-compensatory internship and partly context-devoid and disjointed MD-MBA curriculum, its openness for improvement thanks to its working feedback mechanism and its ability to provide a holistic overview of private and public health sectors would definitely give a nice edge to its students and to the future batches of Atenean doctors to come.
With that, A M D G *mic drop\*
P.S. Comments, discussions, and queries are welcome in the Comments Section below. :)
submitted by B9C2AF25DD to ADMU [link] [comments]

How I Pull 3k+ Monthly As A Nomad Selling Other People's Fiverr Services...

So like a year ago, I lost my remote job whilst traveling.
The SaaS company I'd been doing customer support for closed down (Death Clock)...
(Incomparable to COVID today for some people, but a difficult period for me nonetheless...)
So, I needed to make some money quickly to pay the bills...
One problem though – no sell-able skills nor any sell-able product nor am I one of those web entrepreneurs that can make 10+ figures from a laptop.
I thought about testing Drop Shipping but then a better idea struck me...
Maybe I can sell other people’s services?
I noticed that there are literally hundreds of thousands of talented freelancers selling their skills on freelance platforms like Fiverr, Upwork & PPH.
Plus they are all looking for freelance work...
So, why not get clients for the service they offer and outsource the work to them?
I didn't know it at the time, but I was stepping into service arbitrage, hence what you see others call Drop Servicing today...
Here’s how it worked for me (if you want to replicate...)
First, you find in-demand services that freelancers are already offering at low prices on freelancing websites.
You then market their services to businesses that need it.
Once you get the sale, you hire the freelancers to deliver the work for you.
Through-out delivery you act as a bridge between the freelancer & the service buyer.
You make your money by quoting a higher price to your clients than what your freelancers quote you and pocket the price difference as your profit. -MARK UP :)-
It can be considered the brother of dropshipping.
The sister of the agency model.
You name it...
The main difference is that you are outsourcing the work to other freelancers instead of doing the work yourself.
Important to also note that many agencies are already doing this due to unpredictable deal flows and their reluctance to expand in house capabilities with all the long term contracts included.
---ELI5---

Step 1: Find a profitable service to offer to the right niche.

Most people seem to think that if you want to succeed in your business, you need to come up with a business idea that no one has ever thought of before.
BS!
The key to starting a successful service arbitrage/ Drop Service business is to identify a service that is already trending (through Google Trends & other keyword volume tools) and pair it up with an industry (niche) that reciprocates well with your offer.
The reason we're niching down is to move away from competition/market oversaturation, which is absolutely essential considering the low entry barriers for ANY online business!

Step 2: Find Clients/TEST.

Once you have decided what service you want to offer for your service arbitrage/drop service business, it’s time to get clients/test your service x niche hypothesis.
Two ways of doing that:
The method I had working best for me (right at the beginning) was automated Lead Generation through tools like Phantombuster & We-connect. They allowed for an automated outreach across Linkedin & Facebook at an extremely low price (sub $100/month)

Step 3: Double Down (Scale) / Retest.

Once you've identified your service line and niche, it's time to double the F%$* down on it and scale it beyond the side hustle capacity. (if you intend to, of course)
Should your initial test fail, however, it's then advisable to get back to the drawing board and retest either by changing the service, the niche, the price point, or whatever other variables you see necessary.

-------------------

Up to this point, it's been working quite well for me with Copywriting services. (won't state my niche as there's already enough competition as is.)
THIS WILL MAKE OR BREAK YOU: Most important thing is to pre-vet the providers to make sure that you're working with competent freelancers that can meet the requirements.
Hope this helped)
Feel free to ask any questions below.
----------------------- As demanded in the comments section below. *Not affiliated with anything. Top Resource to learn more regarding service arbitrage is this group I am part of: https://chat.whatsapp.com/DwnUvoW9afV4v55rwOvBHg
We basically discuss, network and reteach this stuff to each other for free.

submitted by ImportantAbalone3 to digitalnomad [link] [comments]

The Dominance of Public Ownership in the Chinese Socialist Market Economy

There are many that seem to believe that China today is a capitalist country, and that ever since 1978, China took the capitalist road. The relative decline of state owned enterprises (SOEs) in China in comparison to the private sector is used as damning evidence in favor of this view.
I will take this article for example:
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/05/why-chinas-state-owned-companies-still-have-a-key-role-to-play/
China’s private sector - which has been revving up since the global financial crisis - is now serving as the main driver of China’s economic growth. The combination of numbers 60/70/80/90 are frequently used to describe the private sector's contribution to the Chinese economy: they contribute 60% of China’s GDP, and are responsible for 70% of innovation, 80% of urban employment and provide 90% of new jobs. Private wealth is also responsible for 70% of investment and 90% of exports.
All of this is seemingly supported by official Chinese data AT FIRST GLANCE.
Taking a closer look, there may be problems in this combination of numbers. While China’s ownership structure has changed dramatically since reform began, claims that the private sector now dominates the economy may be exaggerated.
This comes from a misunderstanding of the use of the terms "state" and "nonstate" in Chinese official statistics.
https://www.heritage.org/testimony/chinese-state-owned-enterprises-and-us-china-economic-relations
The discussion of SOEs has been undermined by a fundamental error: the conflation of restructured, share-holding firms with the truly private sector. Share-holding SOEs are manifestly not private actors and assessments of the corporate sector that assume so are fatally flawed from the outset. The origin of this mistake is historical. As quasi-state entities emerged and proliferated, it was clear some sort of separate treatment was necessary and the concept of “non-state” was created. This was never intended to indicate “private”—quite the opposite: it was meant to signify that the creation of corporate forms quite different from SOEs could occur without privatization and its ideological pitfalls.
The meaning of “non-state” is very well understood by the Chinese government. The (sometimes willful) misunderstanding outside China rests on two shaky pillars. The first is a mis-rendering of “non-state”—where the PRC sees the opposite of state as non-state, many foreign observers see the opposite of state as “private” and simply re-label accordingly. The second is more sophisticated and based on the share-holding change.
Neither specification of share-holders nor sale of stock by itself does anything to alter state control. The large majority of firms listed on domestic stock markets are specifically designated as state-owned. The sale of small minority stakes on foreign exchanges could be construed as recasting mainstays such as CNPC (through its list vehicle PetroChina), China Mobile, and Chinalco as non-state entities of some form. However, they are still centrally directed SOEs, as explicitly indicated by the Chinese government.
Derek Scissors’s claim (the author of the article I am quoting) also has the support of empirical evidence as well.
https://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-chinese-stocks-are-a-state-controlled-facade-2010-6
Even after the enactment of the non-tradable share reform in 2005, the free- float ratio of China A shares remains the lowest in Asia (Exhibit 27).
The State-owned Asset and Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC) is the government entity charged with holding and administering the large state-owned positions. These shares were classified as non-tradable until 2005, when the non-tradable share reform gave share dividends to free-float shareholders in exchange for making the government-held shares tradable (but with certain constraints). Over time, we believe that the SASAC will continue to sell down these holdings on the margin, while keeping the bulk of the shares.
Thus the control and ownership that U.S. share ownership represents is completely different than what Chinese share ownership represents. Simply put, Chinese shares don't translate into effective ownership of their underlying companies.
https://books.google.com/books/about/Capitalism_with_Chinese_Characteristics.html?id=YBpih2Q1X9kC&source=kp_book_description
The OECD economists assign the entire output by legal-person shareholding firms to the private sector. Is this a reasonable approach? Getting this question right is critical. In 1998, legal-person shareholding firms accountedfor 40 percent (11.3/28.9) of the purported private sector. Excluding these firms would reduce the share of the private sector in industrial value-addedfrom 28.9 percent in 1998 to only 17.6 percent (i.e., 28.9 percent minus 11.3 percent). For 2005, the private sector exclusive of legal-person shareholding firms would be 39.8 percent rather than 71.2 percent (i.e., 71.2 percent minus 31.4 percent). This is another illustration of a common refrain in this book – getting the details right matters.
Legal-person shareholding refers to cross-shareholding by firms. Probably because of the connotations of this term, the OECD economists might have assumed that legal-person shareholding implies that China has a keiretsu arrangement similar to that in Japan where firms own each others’ stocks. The difference with Japan, however, is that in China much of the legal-person share capital originates in the state sector, via SOEs establishing or holding significant equity stakes in other firms. These firms then become affiliates or subsidiaries of the SOEs. The subsidiaries of the SOEs, on account of their final ownership, are still SOEs.

Another well-known SOE on the list classified by the OECD study as private is SAIC Motor Corporation Limited (SAIC Motor). In the NBS dataset, the state share of SAIC Motor’s share capital structure is 0 percent; it is 70 percent legal-person shareholding and 30 percent individual shareholding. So this firm qualifies as a private firm in the OECD definition. But SAIC Motor is not even remotely a private firm. SAIC Motor was established in 1997; its predecessor was Shanghai Gear Factory. In 1997, 30 percent of the share capital was issued on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the rest of the share capital was held by Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation (SAIC), which is 100 percent owned by the Shanghai government. Because the Shanghai government owns SAIC Motor via SAIC – a legal-person shareholder – the state share capital is reduced to zero; however, from a control perspective, there is little question about who controls this firm.
The example of SAIC Motor also illustrates the nature of the SOE reforms in the 1990s. Much of the reform effort had nothing to do with actually changing the owners of the firms but rather it was directed at securitizing the full but previously implicit equity holdings of the state in the SOEs. Although these reform measures copy the superficial forms of a capitalistic market economy, none of them has anything to do with its essence – transferring corporate control from government to private investors.
The high concentration of the ownership structure of the legal-person shareholding firms is another sign that these firms are not private at all. In the NBS dataset, SAIC Motor has the most dispersed shareholding structure among the legal-person shareholding firms because 30 percent of its shares are held by individual shareholders. (This is because the firm is listed.) In contrast, of 16,871 legal-person shareholding firms in the NBS dataset for 1998, 75 percent have zero individual share capital. The average individual share capital is only 3.7 percent. This is entirely expected given the heavily accounting nature of the SOE reforms. As evidence, 7,612 of these so-called legal-person shareholding firms are actually factories – they are simply production subsidiaries of other SOEs. This explains the extraordinary concentration of ownership and control of these firms.

A view focusing on the control-right problems of the SOEs ought to have led to the next logical step of contract reforms – management buyouts of the SOEs. But, in the early 1990s, the Chinese leaders reversed the policy on the grounds that the contract reforms did not work. Instead, they embraced an industrial policy approach that actually augmented the control rights of those SOEs that the government had decided to retain. In the 1980s, collective TVEs, such as Kelon, had state revenue rights but private control rights. In the 1990s, in the case of the large SOEs, the situation was completely reversed. Most of the large SOEs, which were listed on China’s two stock exchanges, had partial private revenue rights but complete state control rights.
Between 1990 and 2003, only 6.97 percent of the initial public offerings on the two Chinese stock exchanges were from private-sector companies. The rest were SOEs that issued minority shares but in which managerial control remained very clearly in state hands.27 Put differently, because many shareholding firms in China have private revenue rights but their control rights still rest with the government, they should be considered as state-controlled. According to a detailed study of more than 600 firms on the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SHSE) and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) in 1995, the three main groups of shareholders – state, legal persons, and individual shareholders – each controlled about 30 percent of the outstanding shares (Xu and Wang 1997). This stock split has remained more or less constant since then, although the government has plans to reduce the state shares. The control rights of these firms were overwhelmingly state. According to the same study, although individual shareholding constituted 30 percent of the outstanding shares, on average individual shareholders occupied less than 0.3 percent of the seats on the boards of 154 companies, whereas on average the state was over-represented on the boards. On average, the state retained 50 percent of the seats even though its equity shares amounted to 30 percent. There were no proxy voting procedures, thereby putting the individual shareholders in a disadvantageous position vis-a-vis the institutional investors such as the government agencies. This usurpation of rightful shareholder power is direct evidence that the state harbors no intention of relinquishing its control rights even over those firms that have explicitly private revenue rights.
What does this mean? The mixed ownership corporate enterprises that emerged in China in recent decades are still to a large extent controlled by the state and should be considered to be a part of the public sector. This has considerable implications for what is being discussed at hand. In Chinese statistics, the nonstate sector includes these mixed ownership firms. Thus by making the huge mistake of conflating "nonstate" with "private," analysts mistakenly place mixed ownership firms into the private sector. However, this can be corrected and we come up with the following conclusion instead.
https://www.eastasiaforum.org/2016/05/17/chinas-soe-sector-is-bigger-than-some-would-have-us-think/
The results of forcing such a choice are illustrative. With non-wholly state-funded LLCs included, the public share of fixed investment in the first quarter of 2016 is near 60 per cent. Data from 2013 show the public sector still accounting for only 30 per cent of total firms but roughly 55 per cent of assets, 45 per cent of revenue and 40 per cent of profits.

Those who claim private leadership can say that non-wholly state-funded LLCs are not the same as SOEs. The stronger point is that even some pure SOEs are qualitatively different than they were 20 years ago. But it is a large and mistaken jump from these correct observations to treating mixed or ‘non-state’ as equivalent to private, which Xinhua and many other observers frequently do. The non-traditional-SOE sector may account for 60 per cent of GDP; the private sector does not.
These numbers show that the public sector still maintains its dominance in its contribution GDP and investment.
However, the question still lingers whether contributions to GDP, investment, revenue, etc are accurate in making deductions about the ownership structures in an economy. Chinese economists propose that assets are the most important indicator to evaluate the status of any form of ownership, especially public ownership, in the national economy.
There is strong theoretical reasoning to prove this as well.
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-13-6895-0
Actually, to rely on assets to evaluate the dominant status of public ownership does not only meet the requirement of government policies, but is also deeply rooted in economic theories as well. Classical Marxian economists usually referred to the concept of “property right” when talking about ownership, i.e., the ownership of material production. For example, Marx, when making discussions on the basic features of the new, future society, spoke of the society as “collectively-owned, based on common ownership of the means of production”. Such a concept of ownership of the means of material production had been long in use, which was associated with the social background before the 1950s when various non-material means of production (such as various intangible assets, trademarks, marketing network, computer software and science and technologies) had not been common or important in social production. With technological advances and changes in the means of capitalist production, the various non-material modes became more and more important in the establishment of the capitalist relation of production. Therefore, the denotation and connotations of ownership became richer and richer. For example, some international enterprises originating in developed countries now make use of their advantages in product brands and supply chains to organize international production with little or no reliance on the share of capital investment in their hands; nor do they have to build any facility physically for material production. As a matter of fact, Marx seemed to have foreseen this as he sometimes talked about ownership with vague denotation and used such poorly-defined terms as “external conditions of labor”: “Any way to distribute consumer materials is just the distribution of the productive condition itself… Since the factors of production have to be distributed this way, the distribution of consumer materials has to go this way, too.” Here he did not mention the concept of means of production, but “productive condition” and “factors of production” that had an even wider range of connotations.
Using assets to evaluate the position of public ownership in the Chinese economy, we come to the conclusion that public ownership maintains its dominance.
Public ownership as the dominant form is supported by data. By the end of 2012, the total amount of the operating assets of China’s thrice industries was 487.53 trillion yuan (including the assets of individually-owned businesses), among which 53%, or 258.39 trillion yuan, was owned by the public sector. These data showed that, even with the strictest measurement, public ownership was still the dominant form of the national economy in China, and from the perspective of the ownership structure, the socialist nature of the Chinese society did not change; nor did the reforms change the color of the society. As a matter of fact, the socialist nature of our country also decides that the size of the nonoperating assets of the public sector is also considerable. When the nonoperating assets were included, the total amount of the assets of the Chinese society would be 518.13 trillion yuan (excluding the noncultivated undeveloped resource assets), among which the public owned 288.99 trillion yuan, or 55.78%. The national asset and its size are the externalized cost for efficiency improvement in the operational fields, in which the efficiency of enterprises relies heavily on such social support. Therefore, inspection on the ownership structure of the economy cannot ignore the nonoperating assets.
Now the question is, does this conclusion about the year 2012 apply currently to the year 2020? The answer is a yes.
In terms of the long-term trend, the dominant status of China’s public ownership is guaranteed. First, starting from 2009, the reforms on the ownership structure in China took a turn from rapid changes to fine adjustments. In the first phase (2004–2008), the proportion of public ownership, measured by asset, in the secondary and tertiary industries decreased from 62.73 to 55.48%, while the proportion of the nonpublic ownership increased from 37.27 to 44.52%. In the second phase (2009–2012), however, the proportion of public ownership decreased from 54.32 to 50.44%, and that of the nonpublic, from 45.68 to 49.56%. The numbers showed that the reforms on the ownership structure in China had progressed from wide-range and large-scale changes to a stable phase of fine adjustments. The assets of the public and nonpublic sectors have drawn to stabilization, which suggests that the dominating status of the public sector, measured by asset, will not change in the long-term trend, and the economic system that is based on the dominance of public ownership has been stabilized. Second, the strategic reorganization of SOEs and the public investment used in the state macro-adjustments will continue to accumulate new assets for the publicly-owned economy, which ensures the growth in quantity of both the publicly- and the non-publicly-owned economies. With public ownership as the dominant form, as long as the publicly-owned assets do not increase at a much slower speed than the non-publicly-owned, there is no question for public ownership to remain dominant.
If one needs more quantitative evidence to prove that ownership structure has been stable recently, one need not look further than the Chinese statistical yearbooks, which provide us continuous data on publicly owned assets (but note that this data only is on the industrial sector and leaves out the primary and tertiary sectors).
I made a spreadsheet here which has data from the Chinese statistical yearbooks on the ratio of state owned assets to total assets over time (from 2004 to 2018).
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1eUUMr_sUJxo8ZCRwodsXAQVtjVgv4Vity2ACpe01cCA/edit?usp=sharing
The data obviously shows that, just as the authors of the book predicted, the ownership adjustments in the Chinese economy have been very small and have largely stabilized with no further retreat of the public sector occuring. Thus we can still conclude that the public sector still maintains its dominance in China.
The Chinese statistical yearbooks can be found here:
http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/Statisticaldata/AnnualData/
What I find interesting however is that the authors in the book I quoted from earlier come to the conclusion that the public sector makes up only 35% of output and 25% of employment in the secondary and tertiary industries, which may run counter to Derek Scissors’s claims about the larger contribution of the public sector in GDP, investment, etc. Whatever the case, the point still stands that by using assets as the main indicator, the Chinese public sector still maintains its dominance in the Chinese economy.
How does the position of the Chinese public sector compare to the capitalist countries?
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811368943
First, the publicly-owned assets in China have a higher share. In the secondary and tertiary industries only in 2012, the publicly-owned economic assets reached 226 trillion yuan in China and, according to the study on China’s sovereign assets and liabilities by Li Yang, et al.,10 the non-operating assets (excluding state land resources) reached 30.7 trillion yuan in 2010. The two together accounted for 53.62% of the total assets of the secondary and tertiary industries. In contrast, in the national balance sheet of the U.K., the share of the public sectors is as low as negligible: before the global financial crisis, the net assets of the U.K.’s public departments accounted for 6% of its total assets while in 2010, the percentage was 0 (Appendix Table 24). Similarly, the U.S. owned a total of 2.7 trillion dollar assets according to the national balance sheet of 2011 published by the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Appendix Table 25) while the total assets owned by the U.S. residents and non-profit organizations reached 71 trillion dollars at the same times, giving the government assets a share of only 3.7% (Appendix Table 26). Canada has the same story in that its public sectors owned 2.4% of the total assets of its national economy in 2008 (Appendix Table 27). Germany, as the largest economy in Europe, was once considered to have one of the largest shares of SOEs, but the total assets of its state departments plunged in share, from 1.9% in 2007 to 0.1% in 2011 (Appendix Table 28), and all of its SOEs had a collective amount of assets that did not exceed 100 billion euro.11 Even when we took a round number of 100 billion, the total stateowned assets in Germany was still less than 1.3 trillion euro. The story is somewhat different for the catching-up countries such as Japan and South Korea in that they have relatively higher shares of publicly-owned assets. In Japan, for example, the total assets of public departments had a rapid decrease in share from 8.6% in 2007 to 2.6% in 2011 after the global financial crisis. Meanwhile, South Korea has always managed a high share of publicly-owned assets, which was 18.6% in 2011 (Appendix Table 29). Evidently, we have a much higher share of publicly-owned assets in China compared to capitalist countries, especially when compared to the public departments of the developed capitalist countries.
Even compared to the supposedly "mixed" or "state capitalist" economies of East Asia, publicly owned assets in China are a much larger share of the total than are present in Japan or South Korea, thus affirming the socialist (rather than “state capitalist”) nature of the Chinese economy.
One final question remains however: where is the Chinese economy headed in the next few decades?
The answer can be found in mixed ownership reform. Today, Chinese firms are reorganizing into mixed ownership firms where public sector and private sector firms are intermeshed and the divisions between them are blurred. One thing to note however is that the state will still maintain its dominance in these mixed ownership firms. This can be seen in the asset composition of mixed ownership firms.
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02529203.2014.999905
In the absence of precise data on the different ownership components of corporate enterprises, we can only disaggregate their public and non-public components internally. The data from Yang Xinming and Yang Xuechun’s measurement of the total assets of the mixed ownership economy in 2008 indicate that the public and the private component account for 65 and 35 percent of the total respectively. After calculating the paid-in capital structure from the 2004 census data, we find that the public and private components accounted for 63 and 37 percent of the total respectively, as shown in Table 8. We therefore estimate the proportion of public assets in the total mixed ownership economy to have been 63 percent in 2004-2007 and 65 percent in 2008 and beyond.

Secondly, as indicated in Table 7, the assets of the mixed ownership economy represented by corporate enterprises have been growing extremely fast and are the largest in terms of scale. In 2012, this sector’s assets accounted for 51.8 percent of total productive assets in secondary and tertiary industry, ahead of all other types of enterprises; moreover, the sector is one in which the state-owned economic component is dominant. These data and this analysis offer an empirical basis for the arrangements for deepening reform set out in the Decision of the Third Plenary Session of the 18th CCCPC, which notes that the mixed economy is an important means of realizing the basic economic system and is conducive to amplifying the role of state-owned capital and strengthening the dynamism, control and influence of the state-owned economy.
What the Chinese leadership seeks now is the mutual development of both the public and private sectors in mixed ownership enterprises instead of one sector developing at the expense of the other.
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811368943
Public ownership that dominates the asset structure is very tolerant of the non-publicly-owned economy. The dominating status of the publicly-owned assets provides material support for and is fundamental to China’s socialist ownership, underlies realization of common prosperity, offers a carrier for social functions to operate and, at the same time, strongly propels the development of the non-publicly-owned economy. In fact, the dominating status of the non-publicly-owned economy in output, employment, and taxation is the premise of its existence and development. According to our estimation, among the secondary and tertiary industries in China in 2012, the proportions of added value of the non-publicly- and publicly-owned economies were 67.59 and 32.41%, respectively, and new employment, 75.20 and 24.80%, respectively. Meanwhile, the businesses in the primary industry, such as agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, and fishery, are mostly comprised of family-based ones. Such development of both publicly- and non-publicly-owned economies with their respective status in asset size not matching their corresponding contributions is determined by their distinctive distributions across economic areas, and it also meets the demand of efficiency by the dominating market and by the external economics. Therefore, the domination in asset size by the publicly-owned economy together with the dominating contributions to output and employment made by the non-publicly-owned economy must stand side by side and march forward together. This is the foundation in practice for the “two unswervinglies” policy
In addition:
In addition, with further adjustments of the ownership structure, the dislocation of the domination in asset size of the public sector and the domination in economic contributions of the nonpublic sector will only be furthered. Actually, only with its rapid development can the nonpublic sector fulfill its role as an indispensable part to the socialist market economy, which will further drive SOEs to improve their efficiency so that mutual development will be achieved; and only with complete fusion of the two sectors brought by further improvement of the production efficiency and socialization of them can the primary stage of socialism has a chance to march to a higher stage.
In other words, the current mixed ownership reforms are setting up a huge building block for socialist China to step into a higher stage of socialism, bringing it closer to communism. So when you see articles like these from CGTN, please do not worry! Opening the “commanding heights” of the economy to private/foreign investment and competition is only a measure to further mixed ownership reforms and will not challenge the dominance of public ownership in the Chinese economy.
https://news.cgtn.com/news/2020-05-18/China-unveils-guideline-on-improving-the-socialist-market-economy-QB6Vn3GVbO/index.html
There is a lot more Marxist theoretical backing for mixed ownership reform, but considering the size of this post, the theory behind the mixed ownership reforms will probably have to be something to write for another post.
Anyway, I’ll still leave behind some readings that will be useful to understand the combination of the public sector and market and the intermeshment of the public and private sectors in the Chinese economy to those who are curious.
https://stalinsmoustache.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/chapter-4-chinas-socialist-market-economy-pre-publication.pdf
https://stalinsmoustache.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/not-some-other-ism-06-pre-publication.pdf
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811327261 (chapter 1)
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811368943 (start at page 183)
https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CPE-10-2018-011/full/html
https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CPE-04-2019-0006/full/html
https://philpapers.org/rec/BOEISA-2
I also HIGHLY RECOMMEND reading the articles in the following two journals (using scihub to get past the paywalls):
https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rssc20
https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rict20
submitted by fortniteBot3000 to Sino [link] [comments]

How I got from first stream to affiliate in the first month - I hope this helps you, too. (I spent a lot of time on this, here’s hoping it doesn’t get lost in new)

Hi friends,
I want to first say that this isn’t a scheme or magical program to make Twitch growth “easy.” It also isn’t an effort to get you to subscribe or donate to my channel. The sole purpose of writing this is to attempt to provide all of the information and strategy I’ve used to date in a single, concise and digestible post -- something I wish I had on day one. As such, everything I have to share is below and there’s no link to bring you anywhere else. For those of you that I’ve talked with about this (friends, followers and subs) and those of you I don’t know, I really hope it helps!
Just over five weeks into streaming and I feel very fortunate to say that I reached affiliate status only a few days after the one-month mark. I’ve got 83 followers (only four of whom are people I personally know), 10 organic subscribers and nearly 1,000 views. No programs, No follow for follows, No boosts, No bot viewers/follows, etc. -- No BS. This past week, I averaged around 8 viewers, with some times higher and others lower.
This isn’t a brag. This is to say that there are things that I’ve learned in the past month, read from various resources, and watched over the course of countless youtube videos, that have propelled my stream forward much faster than I ever would’ve anticipated. Some growth strategies you’ll read about from only six months ago may no longer work due to the saturated nature of Twitch, while others may have been developed years ago and still work to this day. Perhaps to you, my numbers are quite low, or maybe you’ve been on your twitch journey for months, still seeking affiliate status but don’t quite know where to go next. Either way, I hope I can offer something to help you below.
Introductions aside, here are the points I’ve found most critical thus far in no particular order;
CAM - It seems to be the consensus among larger streamers and content creators that you absolutely need to have a cam if you want your channel to get anywhere. I completely agree with this sentiment. You are the focal point of your stream. Without a cam, your viewers are essentially watching gameplay footage with commentary here and there which can just as easily be done elsewhere. If you don’t have a cam and can’t afford one, that’s okay! You can actually use your phone as a cam and it’s much easier than you think it would be. Just google “EpocCam.” In my opinion, the app made it fairly self explanatory to set up. There’s a free version of the app and a paid version for something like eight dollars to get rid of the ads. It’s well worth the eight dollars, because the ads make it a frustration and you’ll already have plenty of those elsewhere when setting up your stream for the first time. P.S. I’m not endorsed or sponsored by this company -- If you’ve got a more efficient/inexpensive way to get a cam, take it!
PERSONALITY - Let the you who is you shine through. I just made that up. It’s 4:00AM. In all sincerity, this will likely be the most critical element of your channel. I have a theory on the success of this point which comes from a personal favorite streamer; the two-time himself, DrDisrespect. Doc clearly plays a well-developed character, but it comes across genuine. This gave me the impression of embellishing who he really is. Is Guy Beahm (Doc’s real name) actually an 80’s super villain, destroying anyone and anything in his path from behind the wheel of his red 1990 Lambo? No. BUT is he a guy who’s into the 80’s aesthetic, rages at games, and is a little overly competitive? Probably!
This got me thinking about the idea of taking your own personality and embellishing the bits which make you, YOU. I’ll give you an example. I’m a Zen Buddhist. I’m obsessed with Eastern philosophy and practices of Zen, presence and meditation are a significant part of my life. Therefore, on stream, I take these components and make them the focal point. If you ever watch me on stream, you’ll notice that in moments of absolute chaos and high tensions on screen, I remain almost comically calm and poke fun at the intensity of otherwise high-stress situations. I don’t tilt in moments that might frustrate others and will instead flip situations like these around into thoughts and questions about why we might feel that way. Even when I have engagements with toxic players, you’ll see that rather than engaging them with the reciprocal toxicity they’re looking for, I might say something like “Aw, friend, what happened today? It’s okay, you can tell me about it.” Not sarcastically, but in a genuine way! It’s fun to see if we can take the toxicity out of a teammate, BUT there is one more component to my stream which I would consider most significant. This leads us to our next point.
PASSION/REASON FOR STREAMING - Most people will tell you if you’re in it for the money, get out. I’ve read this sentence a million times. My feeling is that it’s not quite that simple. It’s perfectly okay to approach streaming with the goal of making it your full time job -- That’s exactly what I’m doing! HOWEVER, Consider a person who wants to be a rockstar, but has never written a note of music. Or held a guitar. Or sang outside their shower. They want to be a rockstar for the fame, money, etc. but they’ve got no passion for the art itself. I think we both know it’s very unlikely they’ll get anywhere at all. The same is true of streaming. There’s a point where passion and effort coincide with return. You do it because you love it, but you can’t put everything into it without it becoming your livelihood. You also can’t make it your livelihood without putting everything into it.
Perhaps your passion is the game itself and the will to share it. You want to be a Radiant rank Valorant player, teaming up with Shroud and Summit to play against pros while your fans watch and spam your chat with PogChamps and KEKWs. That’s fantastic and that passion will take you far. There are plenty of passions that can fuel your drive to put in the work when the odds are against you!
When I watched my first Twitch stream, the first thing that struck me was the way that the streamer was able to engage with so many people in chat, while they were simultaneously engaging one another. A more specific point that took my interest was that it was all, for the most part, anonymous. I immediately had the thought that this would be a great platform for people to have a place to get things off their chest. Almost like the next level of jotting frustrations into a diary -- only here, others can see, relate to, and even respond to the things you write in real-time. Even further, what if there were a streamer who, while delivering satisfying one-shot sniper content, could calmly talk over the chaos and offer perspective on the topic for that person and anyone else in chat going through the same sort of difficulties. For me, the passion is the potential to help people who are experiencing anxiety, depression, etc. with the same principals which helped me through these issues while creating a community where my viewers can offer the same for one another, if they choose to. That was the beginning of DrWatts.
UNIQUENESS - This should act as a sort of *bonus point* to the two above points. In a competitive game environment, it should be a given that you are at least decent at your game. It’s unlikely you’d be streaming it otherwise. Even if you’re great at it, it can only play to your advantage to push the aspect of your skill and offer something that few other channels can. While this can mean nearly anything, I’ll share with you the example of what I believe makes my on-screen content unique.
I predominantly stream VALORANT with regular switches to COD Warzone sprinkled between. In Warzone, I solo queue into Trios and use only the Kar98k, regardless of range, with success for the most part. In VALORANT however, it gets a little more elaborate. Essentially, I developed a stream “mini-game” within VALORANT wherein I only use the Marshal scout weapon. Throughout a match, certain things can happen which will force changes to my loadout. Additionally, I’ve added interesting and fun modifiers that chat can activate with channel points to make this “mini-game” more challenging or slightly easier on me. It’s a fun way to keep the gameplay fresh and interesting while keeping chat engaged with the gameplay. You can see the “DrWatts unrated VALORANT rules” in the about section on my channel if you’d like to see this in action. Perhaps it’ll give you some ideas!
OVERLAY - While it isn’t as essential as having the cam feed itself, it is still a critical component in my opinion. Have you ever been on twitch, perhaps looking at a lesser watched game, and decided to click on one of the handful of streamers playing it? Which did you click? I clicked the one with the best looking overlay in that tiny thumbnail box. Why? Because, as a viewer, It says something to me about “They put work into this” - “They care about the quality of their stream” - “They probably know the ropes and are NOT NEW AT THIS” -- even if we are ;). There’s a few ways to approach this hurdle, some more costly than others. You can try to take on making your own overlay (more on this later*), purchase a premium pre-made overlay, or pay someone to custom make one for your channel. While the latter is ideal, I think most of us at the beginning will want to begin with a premium pre-made overlay. For around 30 bucks, you’ll have your stream looking, for the most part, pretty professional.
SCHEDULE AND CONSISTENCY - It is important to have a consistent and identifiable schedule. Your viewers need to know when and where to find you! Try out different schedules as early as possible and find one that works for you. Once you’ve found what works for you and your lifestyle, stick with it as closely as you can. If you want for streaming to become your job, you’ve got to treat it like one! If you’re going to be late or need to change the time of a stream, handle it the same way you would with any other job. Do what you can to let your audience know and try as much as you can to not make a habit of it. Life happens and there isn’t anything we can do about that, but the more consistent you can be, the better!
An important note on this point: Sometimes you need to take a day off and I’d never make a case to prioritize your stream over your mental or physical health. Holding yourself accountable for your schedule is important to your success on Twitch, but nothing is more important than your health, friends.
PLAYING WITH GROUPS - I have mixed feelings on this point. You are the focal point, don’t forget that. It’s great to play with other streamers and friends, but I’d recommend limiting this to a section of your stream, rather than making it an expectation or identifier of your channel. Use it as an enhancement to what you’ve already got to offer, not as a crutch if you aren’t quite feeling confident solo yet. It’s an excellent opportunity to practice engaging your viewers and --if we’re being honest-- talking to yourself! Even when there’s no one to engage with, the lurkers in your chat won’t lurk for long if you’re sitting quietly playing the game. It is absolutely critical that you can stand on your own two feet, so don’t let playing with others inhibit your ability to do so!
BRANDING - This may seem like a point that “doesn’t matter til you’re big.” Remember when I said if you want it to be your job, you’ve got to treat it like a job? Your channel is your business and unless you treat it as such, it will be a failing business. Take that personality you developed and visualize it into a logo. Maybe you know photoshop, or maybe you get a friend to draw it for you. Maybe you make it in MS paint (I hope not). You really just need something that is identifiable as YOU. Once you’ve got it, put it everywhere. Everywhere. Twitch, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, Steam, Discord, Facebook. It will never hurt you to secure your brand on every platform even if you aren’t perpetually posting to each and every one!
If you guys would like to see a follow up post involving the social media marketing stuff I mentioned earlier, this would be another point that I would likely expand on as well.
KNOW WHAT YOU’RE GETTING YOURSELF INTO - This point isn’t to scare you. It’s to encourage you because YOU CAN undoubtedly do this. Further, this is more of a point for those who favor the densely saturated, top played games (Valorant, Warzone, Overwatch, League of Legends, etc.) This is the category that I fall into. You’ll do much more work off-stream than you do on-stream. From social media marketing to a constant influx of content creation, there’s a lot of work to be done. In games like these, you will never see organic growth via Twitch alone. It’s not because you’re not working hard and it’s not because you’re not amazing -- you definitely are. It’s because with only a few viewers, your channel will be buried by 70 pages worth of others trying to do exactly what you’re doing, leaving your only option for discoverability elsewhere -- at least at the beginning. If anyone is interested to see how I’ve approached these aspects of my stream, I’ll gladly do an additional post to cover them (Social media scheduling apps, content curation and editing, etc.)
BUYING FOLLOWERS / FOLLOW FOR FOLLOW / LURK FOR LURK / ETC. - Don’t do this. Just don’t. This is an absolute trap and serves no benefit to your channel. If you meet another streamer along the way and you mutually enjoy each others’ content, that’s awesome (This will happen!), but don’t follow each other simply for the number -- it helps neither of you. There are countless reasons for this being the case and I’ll gladly talk about it with you in a PM or even on stream, but suffice to say there are too many reasons to list why this does not benefit you, nor the people exchanging with you.
MODS - For the obvious reasons, they’re important. You never know when the bots will show up in chat or, worse, when little Timmy is having a bad day and wants to let it out via profanity spam in your chat. Unlucky. Have a close friend or two to help you with this at the start if/when they’re available.
DON’T BE DISCOURAGED - Kudos to you if you’re still reading. I’d definitely wager that you’re committed to this and this point may be moot for you, but still I feel that it’s an important one to address. Developing growth on a streaming platform is hard, that’s for sure. But it’s not impossible and we’re all capable so long as we maintain our commitment to the passions we identified earlier. I have a life experience which taught a particular lesson and still to this day, it’s the most valuable lesson I’ve ever learned. I’d be glad to share that story with anyone who is interested, but it’s applicable to most low-odd gambles and goes something like this:
Every time you get that sensation of “this isn’t working, I want to quit,” so are a 1000 other channels. When those moments happen, YOU are going to be the one to say “No, I’m going to keep going.” Even after a seven hour stream with only 2 viewers. With no willingness to give up, you’ve already differentiated yourself from 50% of channels. THOSE DAYS WITH 3 VIEWERS WILL STILL HAPPEN, I HAVE THOSE DAYS TOO -- Even your most loyal followership will still have a life outside of twitch. Keep that in your mind and don’t allow those discouraging thoughts in. Continue on the same as you would if there were 10, 100, or 1,000 people in chat. One day, friends :)
++ BONUS POINTS - This point is not at all essential, but is more of an ‘above and beyond’ that’ll benefit you along the way. During the course of my Twitch journey thus far, I’ve take it upon myself to learn Adobe Photoshop, Premier Pro and After Effects. I’m by no means a master of any of these programs, but I understand how to use each to a point where I’ve developed my own logo from scratch, made emotes, animated my logo, created a stream commercial and more. As I said, this is by no means essential, but if you should decide to take this point on, It’ll stand to benefit you going forward as it has for me.
Well, friends, we made it. I appreciate you taking the time to read this post and genuinely hope that you found at least a point or two which will help you along your journey through Twitch and beyond. As I said in the beginning, I’m not looking for any kind of return from this post, but feel free to stop by my channel if you’d like to see how I apply all of the points above! I’d be happy to further elaborate on any of the above on stream as well! I have followers that watch regularly who are interested in a lot of the same and enjoy stream discussions.
Let me know in the comments if this helps any of you achieve affiliate status! Thoughts and criticisms are always welcomed as well :)
Best of luck in your Twitch journeys, friends.
-DrWatts
submitted by DrWattsTV to Twitch [link] [comments]

Our own step-by-step startup/project launch checklist

Hey guys! So my co-founder and I launched several projects/businesses over the past 2 years (incl. our marketing agency, local tour agency, and a bunch of other stuff). We usually go through the exact same process for every project launch, so we decided to turn it into a checklist, both for ourselves & the internet people on Reddit.
You can check out the complete checklist here, and here's a Reddit-format-friendly post:

Step #1 - Research Phase

Before you start planning your launch, you need to figure out your overall product and marketing strategy. Here’s what you need to think about:

Step #2 - Slap Together a Website

Time to get things rolling. The next step is to create a website & lay the foundation for your marketing.

Step #3 - Do Some Pre-Launch Marketing

If you have the extra time and resources, you can start marketing your product way before you’ve even launched. Usually, this involves:

Step #4 - Get Some Initial Traction

Once you have an MVP, you want to validate 2 things: that your product works, and that it can drive conversions (and hence, revenue). Here’s how to do it lean:

Step #5 - Prep For Launch

Every startup gets one “launch” in its lifetime. Here’s how to make sure you get it right:

Step #6 - LAUNCH!

Time to hit that big, shiny red button and LAUNCH!
submitted by DrJigsaw to startups [link] [comments]

The Dominance of Public Ownership in the Chinese Socialist Market Economy

There are many that seem to believe that China today is a capitalist country, and that ever since 1978, China took the capitalist road. The relative decline of state owned enterprises (SOEs) in China in comparison to the private sector is used as damning evidence in favor of this view.
I will take this article for example:
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/05/why-chinas-state-owned-companies-still-have-a-key-role-to-play/
China’s private sector - which has been revving up since the global financial crisis - is now serving as the main driver of China’s economic growth. The combination of numbers 60/70/80/90 are frequently used to describe the private sector's contribution to the Chinese economy: they contribute 60% of China’s GDP, and are responsible for 70% of innovation, 80% of urban employment and provide 90% of new jobs. Private wealth is also responsible for 70% of investment and 90% of exports.
All of this is seemingly supported by official Chinese data AT FIRST GLANCE.
Taking a closer look, there may be problems in this combination of numbers. While China’s ownership structure has changed dramatically since reform began, claims that the private sector now dominates the economy may be exaggerated.
This comes from a misunderstanding of the use of the terms "state" and "nonstate" in Chinese official statistics.
https://www.heritage.org/testimony/chinese-state-owned-enterprises-and-us-china-economic-relations
The discussion of SOEs has been undermined by a fundamental error: the conflation of restructured, share-holding firms with the truly private sector. Share-holding SOEs are manifestly not private actors and assessments of the corporate sector that assume so are fatally flawed from the outset. The origin of this mistake is historical. As quasi-state entities emerged and proliferated, it was clear some sort of separate treatment was necessary and the concept of “non-state” was created. This was never intended to indicate “private”—quite the opposite: it was meant to signify that the creation of corporate forms quite different from SOEs could occur without privatization and its ideological pitfalls.
The meaning of “non-state” is very well understood by the Chinese government. The (sometimes willful) misunderstanding outside China rests on two shaky pillars. The first is a mis-rendering of “non-state”—where the PRC sees the opposite of state as non-state, many foreign observers see the opposite of state as “private” and simply re-label accordingly. The second is more sophisticated and based on the share-holding change.
Neither specification of share-holders nor sale of stock by itself does anything to alter state control. The large majority of firms listed on domestic stock markets are specifically designated as state-owned. The sale of small minority stakes on foreign exchanges could be construed as recasting mainstays such as CNPC (through its list vehicle PetroChina), China Mobile, and Chinalco as non-state entities of some form. However, they are still centrally directed SOEs, as explicitly indicated by the Chinese government.
Derek Scissors’s claim (the author of the article I am quoting) also has the support of empirical evidence as well.
https://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-chinese-stocks-are-a-state-controlled-facade-2010-6
Even after the enactment of the non-tradable share reform in 2005, the free- float ratio of China A shares remains the lowest in Asia (Exhibit 27).
The State-owned Asset and Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC) is the government entity charged with holding and administering the large state-owned positions. These shares were classified as non-tradable until 2005, when the non-tradable share reform gave share dividends to free-float shareholders in exchange for making the government-held shares tradable (but with certain constraints). Over time, we believe that the SASAC will continue to sell down these holdings on the margin, while keeping the bulk of the shares.
Thus the control and ownership that U.S. share ownership represents is completely different than what Chinese share ownership represents. Simply put, Chinese shares don't translate into effective ownership of their underlying companies.
https://books.google.com/books/about/Capitalism_with_Chinese_Characteristics.html?id=YBpih2Q1X9kC&source=kp_book_description
The OECD economists assign the entire output by legal-person shareholding firms to the private sector. Is this a reasonable approach? Getting this question right is critical. In 1998, legal-person shareholding firms accountedfor 40 percent (11.3/28.9) of the purported private sector. Excluding these firms would reduce the share of the private sector in industrial value-addedfrom 28.9 percent in 1998 to only 17.6 percent (i.e., 28.9 percent minus 11.3 percent). For 2005, the private sector exclusive of legal-person shareholding firms would be 39.8 percent rather than 71.2 percent (i.e., 71.2 percent minus 31.4 percent). This is another illustration of a common refrain in this book – getting the details right matters.
Legal-person shareholding refers to cross-shareholding by firms. Probably because of the connotations of this term, the OECD economists might have assumed that legal-person shareholding implies that China has a keiretsu arrangement similar to that in Japan where firms own each others’ stocks. The difference with Japan, however, is that in China much of the legal-person share capital originates in the state sector, via SOEs establishing or holding significant equity stakes in other firms. These firms then become affiliates or subsidiaries of the SOEs. The subsidiaries of the SOEs, on account of their final ownership, are still SOEs.

Another well-known SOE on the list classified by the OECD study as private is SAIC Motor Corporation Limited (SAIC Motor). In the NBS dataset, the state share of SAIC Motor’s share capital structure is 0 percent; it is 70 percent legal-person shareholding and 30 percent individual shareholding. So this firm qualifies as a private firm in the OECD definition. But SAIC Motor is not even remotely a private firm. SAIC Motor was established in 1997; its predecessor was Shanghai Gear Factory. In 1997, 30 percent of the share capital was issued on the Shanghai Stock Exchange and the rest of the share capital was held by Shanghai Automotive Industry Corporation (SAIC), which is 100 percent owned by the Shanghai government. Because the Shanghai government owns SAIC Motor via SAIC – a legal-person shareholder – the state share capital is reduced to zero; however, from a control perspective, there is little question about who controls this firm.
The example of SAIC Motor also illustrates the nature of the SOE reforms in the 1990s. Much of the reform effort had nothing to do with actually changing the owners of the firms but rather it was directed at securitizing the full but previously implicit equity holdings of the state in the SOEs. Although these reform measures copy the superficial forms of a capitalistic market economy, none of them has anything to do with its essence – transferring corporate control from government to private investors.
The high concentration of the ownership structure of the legal-person shareholding firms is another sign that these firms are not private at all. In the NBS dataset, SAIC Motor has the most dispersed shareholding structure among the legal-person shareholding firms because 30 percent of its shares are held by individual shareholders. (This is because the firm is listed.) In contrast, of 16,871 legal-person shareholding firms in the NBS dataset for 1998, 75 percent have zero individual share capital. The average individual share capital is only 3.7 percent. This is entirely expected given the heavily accounting nature of the SOE reforms. As evidence, 7,612 of these so-called legal-person shareholding firms are actually factories – they are simply production subsidiaries of other SOEs. This explains the extraordinary concentration of ownership and control of these firms.

A view focusing on the control-right problems of the SOEs ought to have led to the next logical step of contract reforms – management buyouts of the SOEs. But, in the early 1990s, the Chinese leaders reversed the policy on the grounds that the contract reforms did not work. Instead, they embraced an industrial policy approach that actually augmented the control rights of those SOEs that the government had decided to retain. In the 1980s, collective TVEs, such as Kelon, had state revenue rights but private control rights. In the 1990s, in the case of the large SOEs, the situation was completely reversed. Most of the large SOEs, which were listed on China’s two stock exchanges, had partial private revenue rights but complete state control rights.
Between 1990 and 2003, only 6.97 percent of the initial public offerings on the two Chinese stock exchanges were from private-sector companies. The rest were SOEs that issued minority shares but in which managerial control remained very clearly in state hands.27 Put differently, because many shareholding firms in China have private revenue rights but their control rights still rest with the government, they should be considered as state-controlled. According to a detailed study of more than 600 firms on the Shanghai Stock Exchange (SHSE) and the Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) in 1995, the three main groups of shareholders – state, legal persons, and individual shareholders – each controlled about 30 percent of the outstanding shares (Xu and Wang 1997). This stock split has remained more or less constant since then, although the government has plans to reduce the state shares. The control rights of these firms were overwhelmingly state. According to the same study, although individual shareholding constituted 30 percent of the outstanding shares, on average individual shareholders occupied less than 0.3 percent of the seats on the boards of 154 companies, whereas on average the state was over-represented on the boards. On average, the state retained 50 percent of the seats even though its equity shares amounted to 30 percent. There were no proxy voting procedures, thereby putting the individual shareholders in a disadvantageous position vis-a-vis the institutional investors such as the government agencies. This usurpation of rightful shareholder power is direct evidence that the state harbors no intention of relinquishing its control rights even over those firms that have explicitly private revenue rights.
What does this mean? The mixed ownership corporate enterprises that emerged in China in recent decades are still to a large extent controlled by the state and should be considered to be a part of the public sector. This has considerable implications for what is being discussed at hand. In Chinese statistics, the nonstate sector includes these mixed ownership firms. Thus by making the huge mistake of conflating "nonstate" with "private," analysts mistakenly place mixed ownership firms into the private sector. However, this can be corrected and we come up with the following conclusion instead.
https://www.eastasiaforum.org/2016/05/17/chinas-soe-sector-is-bigger-than-some-would-have-us-think/
The results of forcing such a choice are illustrative. With non-wholly state-funded LLCs included, the public share of fixed investment in the first quarter of 2016 is near 60 per cent. Data from 2013 show the public sector still accounting for only 30 per cent of total firms but roughly 55 per cent of assets, 45 per cent of revenue and 40 per cent of profits.

Those who claim private leadership can say that non-wholly state-funded LLCs are not the same as SOEs. The stronger point is that even some pure SOEs are qualitatively different than they were 20 years ago. But it is a large and mistaken jump from these correct observations to treating mixed or ‘non-state’ as equivalent to private, which Xinhua and many other observers frequently do. The non-traditional-SOE sector may account for 60 per cent of GDP; the private sector does not.
These numbers show that the public sector still maintains its dominance in its contribution GDP and investment.
However, the question still lingers whether contributions to GDP, investment, revenue, etc are accurate in making deductions about the ownership structures in an economy. Chinese economists propose that assets are the most important indicator to evaluate the status of any form of ownership, especially public ownership, in the national economy.
There is strong theoretical reasoning to prove this as well.
https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-13-6895-0
Actually, to rely on assets to evaluate the dominant status of public ownership does not only meet the requirement of government policies, but is also deeply rooted in economic theories as well. Classical Marxian economists usually referred to the concept of “property right” when talking about ownership, i.e., the ownership of material production. For example, Marx, when making discussions on the basic features of the new, future society, spoke of the society as “collectively-owned, based on common ownership of the means of production”. Such a concept of ownership of the means of material production had been long in use, which was associated with the social background before the 1950s when various non-material means of production (such as various intangible assets, trademarks, marketing network, computer software and science and technologies) had not been common or important in social production. With technological advances and changes in the means of capitalist production, the various non-material modes became more and more important in the establishment of the capitalist relation of production. Therefore, the denotation and connotations of ownership became richer and richer. For example, some international enterprises originating in developed countries now make use of their advantages in product brands and supply chains to organize international production with little or no reliance on the share of capital investment in their hands; nor do they have to build any facility physically for material production. As a matter of fact, Marx seemed to have foreseen this as he sometimes talked about ownership with vague denotation and used such poorly-defined terms as “external conditions of labor”: “Any way to distribute consumer materials is just the distribution of the productive condition itself… Since the factors of production have to be distributed this way, the distribution of consumer materials has to go this way, too.” Here he did not mention the concept of means of production, but “productive condition” and “factors of production” that had an even wider range of connotations.
Using assets to evaluate the position of public ownership in the Chinese economy, we come to the conclusion that public ownership maintains its dominance.
Public ownership as the dominant form is supported by data. By the end of 2012, the total amount of the operating assets of China’s thrice industries was 487.53 trillion yuan (including the assets of individually-owned businesses), among which 53%, or 258.39 trillion yuan, was owned by the public sector. These data showed that, even with the strictest measurement, public ownership was still the dominant form of the national economy in China, and from the perspective of the ownership structure, the socialist nature of the Chinese society did not change; nor did the reforms change the color of the society. As a matter of fact, the socialist nature of our country also decides that the size of the nonoperating assets of the public sector is also considerable. When the nonoperating assets were included, the total amount of the assets of the Chinese society would be 518.13 trillion yuan (excluding the noncultivated undeveloped resource assets), among which the public owned 288.99 trillion yuan, or 55.78%. The national asset and its size are the externalized cost for efficiency improvement in the operational fields, in which the efficiency of enterprises relies heavily on such social support. Therefore, inspection on the ownership structure of the economy cannot ignore the nonoperating assets.
Now the question is, does this conclusion about the year 2012 apply currently to the year 2020? The answer is a yes.
In terms of the long-term trend, the dominant status of China’s public ownership is guaranteed. First, starting from 2009, the reforms on the ownership structure in China took a turn from rapid changes to fine adjustments. In the first phase (2004–2008), the proportion of public ownership, measured by asset, in the secondary and tertiary industries decreased from 62.73 to 55.48%, while the proportion of the nonpublic ownership increased from 37.27 to 44.52%. In the second phase (2009–2012), however, the proportion of public ownership decreased from 54.32 to 50.44%, and that of the nonpublic, from 45.68 to 49.56%. The numbers showed that the reforms on the ownership structure in China had progressed from wide-range and large-scale changes to a stable phase of fine adjustments. The assets of the public and nonpublic sectors have drawn to stabilization, which suggests that the dominating status of the public sector, measured by asset, will not change in the long-term trend, and the economic system that is based on the dominance of public ownership has been stabilized. Second, the strategic reorganization of SOEs and the public investment used in the state macro-adjustments will continue to accumulate new assets for the publicly-owned economy, which ensures the growth in quantity of both the publicly- and the non-publicly-owned economies. With public ownership as the dominant form, as long as the publicly-owned assets do not increase at a much slower speed than the non-publicly-owned, there is no question for public ownership to remain dominant.
If one needs more quantitative evidence to prove that ownership structure has been stable recently, one need not look further than the Chinese statistical yearbooks, which provide us continuous data on publicly owned assets (but note that this data only is on the industrial sector and leaves out the primary and tertiary sectors).
I made a spreadsheet here which has data from the Chinese statistical yearbooks on the ratio of state owned assets to total assets over time (from 2004 to 2018).
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1eUUMr_sUJxo8ZCRwodsXAQVtjVgv4Vity2ACpe01cCA/edit?usp=sharing
The data obviously shows that, just as the authors of the book predicted, the ownership adjustments in the Chinese economy have been very small and have largely stabilized with no further retreat of the public sector occuring. Thus we can still conclude that the public sector still maintains its dominance in China.
The Chinese statistical yearbooks can be found here:
http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/Statisticaldata/AnnualData/
What I find interesting however is that the authors in the book I quoted from earlier come to the conclusion that the public sector makes up only 35% of output and 25% of employment in the secondary and tertiary industries, which may run counter to Derek Scissors’s claims about the larger contribution of the public sector in GDP, investment, etc. Whatever the case, the point still stands that by using assets as the main indicator, the Chinese public sector still maintains its dominance in the Chinese economy.
How does the position of the Chinese public sector compare to the capitalist countries?
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811368943
First, the publicly-owned assets in China have a higher share. In the secondary and tertiary industries only in 2012, the publicly-owned economic assets reached 226 trillion yuan in China and, according to the study on China’s sovereign assets and liabilities by Li Yang, et al.,10 the non-operating assets (excluding state land resources) reached 30.7 trillion yuan in 2010. The two together accounted for 53.62% of the total assets of the secondary and tertiary industries. In contrast, in the national balance sheet of the U.K., the share of the public sectors is as low as negligible: before the global financial crisis, the net assets of the U.K.’s public departments accounted for 6% of its total assets while in 2010, the percentage was 0 (Appendix Table 24). Similarly, the U.S. owned a total of 2.7 trillion dollar assets according to the national balance sheet of 2011 published by the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Appendix Table 25) while the total assets owned by the U.S. residents and non-profit organizations reached 71 trillion dollars at the same times, giving the government assets a share of only 3.7% (Appendix Table 26). Canada has the same story in that its public sectors owned 2.4% of the total assets of its national economy in 2008 (Appendix Table 27). Germany, as the largest economy in Europe, was once considered to have one of the largest shares of SOEs, but the total assets of its state departments plunged in share, from 1.9% in 2007 to 0.1% in 2011 (Appendix Table 28), and all of its SOEs had a collective amount of assets that did not exceed 100 billion euro.11 Even when we took a round number of 100 billion, the total stateowned assets in Germany was still less than 1.3 trillion euro. The story is somewhat different for the catching-up countries such as Japan and South Korea in that they have relatively higher shares of publicly-owned assets. In Japan, for example, the total assets of public departments had a rapid decrease in share from 8.6% in 2007 to 2.6% in 2011 after the global financial crisis. Meanwhile, South Korea has always managed a high share of publicly-owned assets, which was 18.6% in 2011 (Appendix Table 29). Evidently, we have a much higher share of publicly-owned assets in China compared to capitalist countries, especially when compared to the public departments of the developed capitalist countries.
Even compared to the supposedly "mixed" or "state capitalist" economies of East Asia, publicly owned assets in China are a much larger share of the total than are present in Japan or South Korea, thus affirming the socialist (rather than “state capitalist”) nature of the Chinese economy.
One final question remains however: where is the Chinese economy headed in the next few decades?
The answer can be found in mixed ownership reform. Today, Chinese firms are reorganizing into mixed ownership firms where public sector and private sector firms are intermeshed and the divisions between them are blurred. One thing to note however is that the state will still maintain its dominance in these mixed ownership firms. This can be seen in the asset composition of mixed ownership firms.
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02529203.2014.999905
In the absence of precise data on the different ownership components of corporate enterprises, we can only disaggregate their public and non-public components internally. The data from Yang Xinming and Yang Xuechun’s measurement of the total assets of the mixed ownership economy in 2008 indicate that the public and the private component account for 65 and 35 percent of the total respectively. After calculating the paid-in capital structure from the 2004 census data, we find that the public and private components accounted for 63 and 37 percent of the total respectively, as shown in Table 8. We therefore estimate the proportion of public assets in the total mixed ownership economy to have been 63 percent in 2004-2007 and 65 percent in 2008 and beyond.

Secondly, as indicated in Table 7, the assets of the mixed ownership economy represented by corporate enterprises have been growing extremely fast and are the largest in terms of scale. In 2012, this sector’s assets accounted for 51.8 percent of total productive assets in secondary and tertiary industry, ahead of all other types of enterprises; moreover, the sector is one in which the state-owned economic component is dominant. These data and this analysis offer an empirical basis for the arrangements for deepening reform set out in the Decision of the Third Plenary Session of the 18th CCCPC, which notes that the mixed economy is an important means of realizing the basic economic system and is conducive to amplifying the role of state-owned capital and strengthening the dynamism, control and influence of the state-owned economy.
What the Chinese leadership seeks now is the mutual development of both the public and private sectors in mixed ownership enterprises instead of one sector developing at the expense of the other.
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811368943
Public ownership that dominates the asset structure is very tolerant of the non-publicly-owned economy. The dominating status of the publicly-owned assets provides material support for and is fundamental to China’s socialist ownership, underlies realization of common prosperity, offers a carrier for social functions to operate and, at the same time, strongly propels the development of the non-publicly-owned economy. In fact, the dominating status of the non-publicly-owned economy in output, employment, and taxation is the premise of its existence and development. According to our estimation, among the secondary and tertiary industries in China in 2012, the proportions of added value of the non-publicly- and publicly-owned economies were 67.59 and 32.41%, respectively, and new employment, 75.20 and 24.80%, respectively. Meanwhile, the businesses in the primary industry, such as agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, and fishery, are mostly comprised of family-based ones. Such development of both publicly- and non-publicly-owned economies with their respective status in asset size not matching their corresponding contributions is determined by their distinctive distributions across economic areas, and it also meets the demand of efficiency by the dominating market and by the external economics. Therefore, the domination in asset size by the publicly-owned economy together with the dominating contributions to output and employment made by the non-publicly-owned economy must stand side by side and march forward together. This is the foundation in practice for the “two unswervinglies” policy
In addition:
In addition, with further adjustments of the ownership structure, the dislocation of the domination in asset size of the public sector and the domination in economic contributions of the nonpublic sector will only be furthered. Actually, only with its rapid development can the nonpublic sector fulfill its role as an indispensable part to the socialist market economy, which will further drive SOEs to improve their efficiency so that mutual development will be achieved; and only with complete fusion of the two sectors brought by further improvement of the production efficiency and socialization of them can the primary stage of socialism has a chance to march to a higher stage.
In other words, the current mixed ownership reforms are setting up a huge building block for socialist China to step into a higher stage of socialism, bringing it closer to communism. So when you see articles like these from CGTN, please do not worry! Opening the “commanding heights” of the economy to private/foreign investment and competition is only a measure to further mixed ownership reforms and will not challenge the dominance of public ownership in the Chinese economy.
https://news.cgtn.com/news/2020-05-18/China-unveils-guideline-on-improving-the-socialist-market-economy-QB6Vn3GVbO/index.html
There is a lot more Marxist theoretical backing for mixed ownership reform, but considering the size of this post, the theory behind the mixed ownership reforms will probably have to be something to write for another post.
Anyway, I’ll still leave behind some readings that will be useful to understand the combination of the public sector and market and the intermeshment of the public and private sectors in the Chinese economy to those who are curious.
https://stalinsmoustache.files.wordpress.com/2020/06/chapter-4-chinas-socialist-market-economy-pre-publication.pdf
https://stalinsmoustache.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/not-some-other-ism-06-pre-publication.pdf
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811327261 (chapter 1)
https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9789811368943 (start at page 183)
https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CPE-10-2018-011/full/html
https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CPE-04-2019-0006/full/html
https://philpapers.org/rec/BOEISA-2
I also HIGHLY RECOMMEND reading the articles in the following two journals (using scihub to get past the paywalls):
https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rssc20
https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rict20
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