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bprs07 Case Study Month #1

Hello again, /juststart! (Long time, no see.) Welcome to month 1 of my case study.

Who am I?

I'm bprs07 and I ran a 17-month case study here from March 2017 through August 2018. (Link) It was my first foray into affiliate marketing with my site making $8,551 in that final update.
When I first joined this sub I think there were 9,000 subscribers. It's over 50,000 now, so looks like there's a lot more competition for me to beat this time around!

What have I been up to?

Since that final update, a lot has happened:
Plus a ton more stuff, much of which I'm sure I've forgotten until I look through my photos.

How's my flagship affiliate site doing?

Things were chugging along splendidly until the November 2019 Google update when I lost about 40% of my traffic. Interestingly, that traffic loss doesn't seem to be unique to my site. It seems nearly every affiliate site in my niche (household products) lost similar amounts of traffic except for 2-3 industry-leading competitors.
It seems like Google changed up their SERPs to display more features, like product listings, while pushing affiliate sites down to the bottom of page 1 or onto page 2.
Now, I'll be completely honest here: It's been a busy last 18 months for us and we've definitely been doing more living than working. I left this site mostly to its own devices, only putting in a couple of hours per week (some weeks no work) maintaining it. I published almost zero new content and hardly did any backlink outreach. I was asking for this to happen.
Instead, most of my time went into a few side projects:
Regarding consulting, I can't believe I ever decided to get back into that. One of the primary reasons I got into affiliate marketing was because I hated reporting to other people. But after nearly a year of only reporting to myself, I found I missed collaborating on different projects.
Having a set schedule with clients also helps me stay accountable.
Once we adopted Olive in January, we found ourselves staying home more often to help her adjust to her new nomadic lifestyle. That meant a lot more time working, so I decided to build out my consulting business more while planning a new affiliate project (the one you're reading about here).
Truthfully, I missed the accountability of posting monthly updates. I'm excited to share my journey with you all again!

Niche Selection

I launched my first affiliate site on February 24, 2017. I thought it would be poetic to launch this new site on the same day: February 24, 2020.
I don't plan on spending big bucks buying backlinks for this site, which means niche selection is hugely important. I'm looking for that Goldilocks zone where there's enough traffic upside without TOO much competition.
I also firmly believe in being at least SOMEWHAT interested in your subject matter, so I brainstormed a few ideas and did an hour of high-level research into competitors and available affiliate programs.
Ultimately, I landed on my new niche: Homes, Home Improvement & Backyard/Gardening.
It's basically a "be a King of your castle" blog with a bunch of potential sub-niches I plan to target.
The next question becomes: Where should I start?
I found a bunch of my competitors and downloaded their backlink and traffic stats from both Ahrefs and Majestic.
CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPETITOR ANALYSIS
The list goes deeper than the top 30, but that's a good idea of what I'm up against.
Then I scraped the top pages from these competitors to figure out what keywords they're ranking for. I compiled all of these keywords in an Excel file and went to work categorizing them all into my theoretical sub-niches (think of these as WordPress categories) and organizing them by search intent into four different groups:
  • "Best of" roundups
  • Single product reviews
  • Comparisons (this vs that)
  • Questions (keywords that start with who/what/when/where/why/how)
Then I loaded it all into RStudio (my plotting program of choice) and visualized everything to figure out where to focus my initial efforts.
CLICK HERE FOR THE PLOT

The age old question: money or info content?

I like to start with informational content for two reasons:
  • I want the site to look like a legit authority and not a quick cash-grab affiliate site (this is good for backlink outreach).
  • Early money content won't rank for months anyway and I'm in it for the long haul.
From the image above, I decided to start with two categories: Grilling and Tools.
Why? On the "question" and "comparison" charts above, I liked their higher volumes with relatively low keyword difficulties, and I think a site that's initially based on grilling and tools fits my vision to a T: "be the King of your castle."
All told, I spent 6 hours on niche selection and keyword research before doing anything else.

Then the usual setup stuff

It took 90 minutes to find and purchase a domain. I ended up going with something brandable instead of keyword stuffed, though the domain is easily recognizable as being related to this niche (so I didn't pick something like "Noom" where you don't know what it is at first glance).
I purchased the domain through my host, A2 Hosting, then did the various things you need to do when launching a new site:
  • Installed WordPress
  • Set up SSL using LetsEncrypt
  • Created an email address ([email protected]...)
  • Installed a theme (StudioPress/Genesis)
  • Uploaded and configured plugins
(Oh yeah, my name is Bryan.)
These are the plugins I use:
  • Akismet (spam)
  • Atomic Blocks (Gutenberg formatting/blocks)
  • Autoptimize (site speed)
  • ConvertKit (email list)
  • Easy Hide Login (security)
  • Easy Table of Contents
  • EWWW Image Optimizer (site speed)
  • Genesis Simple Hooks (easy edits)
  • Rank Math SEO (better than Yoast)
  • WP Word Count
  • WPForms Lite (contact forms)
This whole setup process took me another hour.

Site Design

I don't spend a ton of time on this in the early going because I want to make headway on content. I can always improve this later, so for now I created a basic text-only logo in Canva, picked a color scheme, added the custom CSS elements I always use (for things like call-out boxes, image borders, etc.) and then started writing.

Content Creation

I skipped the About and Contact pages altogether and barely touched the home page. I'll get to that stuff in the next month (or whenever traffic starts coming in).
With my initial categories chosen (grilling and tools) it's time to get started on the informational content. In this first week, I published 7 articles with the following stats:
Article Category Format Ahrefs KD Ahrefs Searches Length (Words)
Article 1 Grilling Question 0 KD 2,600 950
Article 2 Grilling Comparison 3 KD 3,400 2,500
Article 3 Grilling Question 0 KD 1,100 2,750
Article 4 Grilling Comparison 2 KD 2,400 3,300
Article 5 Grilling Review 1 KD 4,700 1,900
Article 6 Grilling Comparison 0 KD 900 3,100
Article 7 Grilling Question 0 KD 1,700 1,700
All told, that's 7 articles and 16,200 words (2,314 words per article).
I want to talk about Article 4 more. It was a Brand X vs Brand Y comparison. I love these articles for four reasons:
  • The searcher usually is ready to buy and has narrowed down their decision.
  • These posts serve as good "hubs" to link out to individual reviews.
  • You need to do a lot of research about the niche to really nail the content.
  • Extensive product research sets itself up well for one of my favorite content upgrades: downloadable, sortable files of product specs.
Regarding that last one, those product spec lists are awesome because they make it incredibly easy to write future reviews and product comparisons. I'll need all that info eventually, so I might as well do it all at the beginning while the research is fresh in my mind.
Between these two brands, I identified 42 products and 19 product specs (e.g., size, weight, etc.). Some specs are easy to complete looking at product photos. Others require reading product pages on various retailers' websites. Sometimes I have to read the user manuals (the URLs of which I saved as well because user manuals are always useful).
That Brand X vs Brand Y comparison changed up my strategy. I wanted to pound out more info content, but I felt like I had some product knowledge momentum and decided to keep with it for Articles 5 (a review) and 6 (Brand X vs Brand Z comparison this time).

Total Time Invested: 73 hours in Month 1

One thing I didn't do with my first case study was log my time invested in the site. That's something I want to do this time around.
My goal will be to work 20-30 hours per week on this project, but my consulting gigs take priority.
Thankfully, we're in the middle of a stay-at-home quarantine! (Sarcasm.) The silver lining? Plenty of time to work.

Traffic Stats

Month Organic Referral Social Direct Total
Month 1 (Mar) 7 0 0 0 7
Total 7 0 0 0 7

Earnings Stats

I haven't joined a single affiliate program and don't plan to until I have sufficient traffic. While I will join Amazon Associates, I think much/most of my revenue will come from other programs.
Month Clicks Ord Items Ship Items Conv Revenue Earnings Rev/Ship Clicks/Sess
Month 1 (Mar) 0 0 0 0 0 $0.00 $0.00 n/a
Total 0 0 0 n/a $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 n/a

Money Stuff

Earnings Breakdown
Month Amzn Aff Non-Amzn Aff Ads Total Rev Rev / 1K Sess %Amzn
Month 1 (Mar) $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 n/a
Total $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 n/a
Expenses
Many of the costs below are shared across multiple projects, so the per-project cost is lower than shown here. However, I have included the full costs to simulate this being my only project.
  • Ahrefs: $82.00 per month (annual billing rate)
  • Majestic: $49.00 per month
  • Domain Reg + WHOIS Protection: $24.90
  • A2 Hosting: $27.99 per month
  • Genesis Theme (StudioPress): $54.95
  • Month 1 Total: $238.84
  • Case Study Total: $238.84
Net Income
Period Income Expenses Net Income
Month 1 (Mar) $0.00 ($238.84) ($238.84)
Total $0.00 ($238.84) ($238.84)
Thanks as always for reading. Comment below with any questions/clarifications.
It's good to be back!
submitted by bprs07 to juststart [link] [comments]

SEO is Not Hard . A step-by-step SEO Tutorial for beginners that will get you ranked every single time

Note: This is a chapter out of my Growth Hacking Book called Secret Sauce: The Ultimate Growth Hacking Guide. This is only one of the 17 chapters that read just like this.
Also, the links I posted here are broken, but you can view the whole thing beautifully formatted on Medium here
After my post about making money from an affiliate site was at the top of this sub for a couple days, I've received more than 50 PMs asking for more info on how SEO works and how to get authority sites ranking. I have a chapter about that in my book, so I'm just going to publish it for free.
For what it's worth, I drive millions of dollars of traffic in the most competitive key terms online, including with new sites, so if you come in here to comment "this won't work" you're wrong. It's hard work, but it's not unreasonably hard. So much so that I decided to call it "SEO is not hard."
Formatting on reddit is hard, so it's also on Medium here.
It's also one of the several chapters of a book I wrote, which you can purchase here

SEO is Not Hard — A step-by-step SEO Tutorial for beginners that will get you ranked every single time

SEO In One Day

SEO is simply not as hard as people pretend like it is; you can get 95% of the effort with 5% of the work, and you absolutely do not need to hire a professional SEO to do it, nor will it be hard to start ranking for well-picked key terms.
Of all the channels we’ll be discussing, SEO is the one that there is the most misinformation about. Some of it is subtle, but some of it is widely spread and believed by so-called SEO consultants who actually don’t know what they’re doing.
SEO is very simple, and unless you’re a very large company it’s probably not worth hiring somebody else to do. It’s also something that has a lot of faux veneer around it. Consultants want to make it seem incredibly difficult so that they can charge you a lot, but I'll show you exactly how to do it, step by step, and you'll win.
How Google Works In order to understand what we need to do for SEO let’s look back at how Google started, how it’s evolving today, and develop a groundwork from which we can understand how to get ranked on Google.
First, we're going to reverse engineer what Google is doing, and then simply follow their rules, picking the right keywords, and get your sites ranked.

The Early Days of Google

The idea for PageRank — Google’s early ranking algorithm — stemmed from Einstein. Larry Page and Sergei Brin were students at Stanford, and they noticed how often scientific studies referred to famous papers, such as the theory of relativity. These references acted almost like a vote — the more your work was referenced the more important it must be. If they downloaded every scientific paper and looked at the references, they could theoretically decide which papers were the most important, and rank them.
They realized that because of links, the Internet could be analyzed and ranked in a similar way, except instead of using references they could use links. So they set about attempting to “download” (or crawl) the entire Internet, figuring out which sites were linked to the most. The sites with the most links were, theoretically, the best sites. And if you did a search for “university,” they could look at the pages that talked about “university” and rank them.

Google Today

Google works largely the same way today, although with much more sophistication and nuance. For example, not all links carry the same weight. A link from an authoritative site (as seen by how many links a site has pointing at it) is much more valuable than a link from a non-authoritative site. A link from Wikipedia is probably worth about 10,000 links from sites that don’t have much authority.
At the end of the day the purpose of Google is to find the “best” (or most popular) web page for the words you type into the search bar.
All this means is we need to make it clear to google what our page is about, and then make it clear that we’re popular. If we do that we win. In order to do that, we’ll follow a very simple process that works every single time with less effort than you probably think is required.

Gaming the System

Google is a very smart company. The sophistication of the algorithms they write is incredible; bear in mind that there are currently cars driving themselves around Silicon Valley powered by Google’s algorithms.
If you get too far into the SEO rabbit hole you’ll start stumbling upon spammy ways to attempt to speed up this process. Automated software like RankerX, GSA SER, and Scraperbox, instructions to create spam or spin content, linkwheels, PBNs, hacking domains, etc.
Some of that stuff works very short term, but Google is smart and it is getting smarter. It gets harder to beat Google every day, and Google gets faster at shutting down spammy sites every day. Most don’t even last a week before everything you’ve done disappears and your work evaporates. That’s not the way you should do things.
Instead of Internet-based churn and burn we’ll be focusing on building equity in the Internet. So if you see some highly-paid SEO consultant telling you to use software and spun content to generate links, or when you see some blackhatter beating the system, just know that it’s not worth it. We’re going to build authority and get traffic fast, but we’re going to do it in a way that doesn’t disappear or cripple your site in the future.

On-Page SEO

The first step in getting our site ready to rank is making it clear to Google what our site is about.
For now we’re going to focus our home page (our landing page) on ranking for one keyword that isn’t our brand or company name. Once we do that and get that ranking we can branch out into other keywords and start to dominate the search landscape, but for now we’ll stay laser focused.
Keyword Research The first thing we need to do is to figure out what that keyword is. Depending on how popular our site is and how long it’s been around, the level of traffic and difficulty we’ll get from this effort may vary.

The Long Tail

There’s a concept we need to be familiar with known as the “long tail.”
If we were to graph “popularity” of most things with “popularity” being the Y axis and the rank order being the Y axis, we’d get something like a power law graph:
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*BJTF2S1LVXK5ig75
There are some big hits that get the majority of attention, and after a few hits the graph falls sharply. The long-tail theory says that as we become more diverse as a society the yellow end of the above graph will stretch forever and get taller.
Think of Amazon. They probably have a few best-selling products, but the majority of their retail revenue comes from a wide variety of things that aren’t bought anywhere nearly as often as their best-selling products. Similarly, if we were to rank the popularity of the songs played in the last 10 years, there would be a few hits that would garner the majority of plays, and an enormous number of songs that have only a few plays. Those less popular products and songs are what we call the long tail.
In SEO this matters because, at least in the beginning, we’re going to go after long tail keywords — very exact, intention-driven keywords with lower competition that we know can win, then gradually we’ll work our way to the left.
Our site isn’t going to outrank ultra-competitive keywords in the beginning, but by being more specific we can start winning very targeted traffic with much less effort.
The keywords we’re looking for we will refer to as “long-tail keywords.”

Finding the Long Tail

In order to find our perfect long-tail keywords, we’re going to use a combination of four tools, all of which are free.
The process looks like this:
  1. Use UberSuggest, KeywordShitter and a little bit of brainstorming to come up with some keywords
  2. Export those keywords to the Google Keyword Planner to estimate traffic level
  3. Search for those keywords with the SEOQuake chrome extension installed to analyze the true keyword difficulty
Don’t be intimidated — it’s actually very simple. For this example we’ll pretend like we were finding a keyword for this book (and we’ll probably have to build out a site so you see if we’re ranked there in a few months).

Step 1: Brainstorming and Keyword Generating

In this step we’re simply going to identify a few keywords that seem like they might work. Don’t concentrate too much on culling the list at this point, as most bad keywords will be automatically eliminated as a part of the process.
So since this is a book about growth hacking, I’m going to list out a few keywords that would be a good fit:
That’s a good enough list to start. If you start running out of ideas go ahead and check out keywordshitter.com. If you plug in one keyword it will start spitting out thousands of variations in just a few minutes. Try to get a solid list of 5–10 to start with.
Now we’ll plug each keyword into UberSuggest. When I plug the first one — “growth hacking” — in, I get 246 results.
Clicking “view as text” will let us copy and paste all of our keywords into a text editor and create an enormous list.
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*BkT8uUYV3p2hsXCI.
Go through that process with each keyword you came up with.
Now we’ll assume you have 500+ keywords. If you don’t, try to start with something more generic and broad as a keyword, and you’ll have that many quickly. Ideally you’ll have over 1500.

Step 2: Traffic Estimating

Now that we have a pretty good list of keywords. Our next step is to figure out if they have enough search volume to be worth our while.
You’ll likely notice that some are so far down the long tail they wouldn’t do much for us. For example, my growth hacking list came up with “5 internet marketing techniques.” We probably won’t go after that one, but instead of guessing we can let Google do the work for us. This will be our weeding out step.

Google Keyword Planner

The Google Keyword Planner is a tool meant for advertisers, but it does give us some rough idea of traffic levels.
Google doesn’t make any promise of accuracy, so these numbers are likely only directionally correct, but they’re enough to get us on the right track.
You’ll have to have an AdWords account to be able to use the tool, but you can create one for free if you haven’t use AdWords in the past.
Once you’ve logged in, select “Get search volume data and trends.”
Paste in your enormous list of keywords, and click “Get search volume.” Once you’ve done so, you’ll see a lot of graphs and data.
Unfortunately the Keyword Planner interface is a little bit of a nightmare to work within, so instead we’re going to export our data to excel with the “download” button and play with it there.
Now what we’re going to do is decide what traffic we want to go after.
This varies a bit based on how much authority your site has. So let’s try to determine how easy it will be for you to rank.
Go to SEMrush.com and enter your URL, looking at the total backlinks in the third column:
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*aV3sF59d8Bt3Aqqw.
As a general rule (this may vary based on how old your site is, who the links are from, etc.), based on the number of links you have, this is the maximum level of “difficulty” you should go after.
Number of Backlinks:Maximum Difficulty
<30:40
<100:40–50
<1000:50–70
1000+:70+
Go ahead and sort the data by difficulty, and eliminate all of the stuff that is too high for your site (don’t worry, we’ll get those keywords later). For now you can simply delete those rows.

Exact Match

One important thing to note is that Google gives us this volume as “exact match” volume. This means that if there is a slight variation of a keyword we will see it if the words are synonyms, but not if they are used in a phrase, so the traffic will be underestimated from what you would expect overall.
Now with that disclaimer sort the traffic volume highest to lowest, and from this data pick out five keywords that seem like a good fit.
Here are mine:
Mine all look the same, but that may not necessarily be the case.

Keyword Trends

Unfortunately the “keyword difficulty” that Google gives us is based on paid search traffic, not on natural search traffic.
First, let’s use Google Trends to view the keyword volume and trajectory simultaneously. You can enter all of the keywords at the same time and see them graphed against each other. For my keywords it looks like this:
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*10BiNkXI3C3mEvYb.
The ones I’m most excited about are purple and red, which are “Growth hacking techniques” and “Growth hacking Twitter.”
Now we’ll take a deeper look at what the competition is like for those two keywords.

Manual Keyword Difficulty Analysis

In order to analyze how difficult it will be to rank for a certain keyword, we’re going to have to look at the keywords manually, one by one. That’s why we started by finding some long-tail keywords and narrowing the list.
This process gets a lot easier if you download the SEOQuake Chrome extension. Once you’ve done that, do a Google search and you’ll notice a few changes.
With SEOQuake turned on the relevant SEO data of each site is displayed below each search result.
We’re going to alter what is displayed, so in the left-hand sidebar click “parameters” and set them to the following:
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*qVN8Re6-d0RqvJ07.
Now when you search, you’ll see something like this:
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*9c46odS5ItXx3F5X.
SEOQuake adds a ranking number, and the following at the bottom:
The Google Index: This is how many pages from this base URL Google has indexed
Page Links: The number of pages linking to the exact domain that is ranking according to SEMrush’s index (usually very low compared to reality, but since we’ll be using this number to compare it wil be somewhat apples to apples)
URL Links: The number of pages pointing to any page on the base URL
Age: The first time the page was indexed by the Internet Archive
Traffic: A very rough monthly traffic number for the base URL
Looking at these we can try to determine approximately what it would take to overtake the sites in these positions.
You’ll notice that the weight of the indicators change. Not all links are from as good of sources, direct page links matter much more than URL links, etc., but if you google around and play with it for a while you’ll get a pretty good idea of what it takes.
If you have a brand new site it will take a month or two to start generating the number of links to get to page one. If you have an older site with more links it may just be a matter of getting your on-page SEO in place. Generally it will be a mixture of both.
Keep in mind that we’re going to optimize our page for this exact keyword, so we have a bit of an advantage. That said, if you start to see pages from sites like Wikipedia, you will know it’s an uphill battle.
Here are a couple of examples so you can see how you should think through these things, starting with “Growth hacking techniques.”
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*YErpxe0guQCv8f2E.
Entrepreneur.com is definitely a big name, and “growth hacking techniques” is in the title explicitly. This will be difficult to beat, but there are no links in the SEMRush index that point direct to the page.
(By the way, I wonder how hard it would be to write an article for entrepreneur.com — I could probably do that and build a few links to that easily, even linking to my site in the article).
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*hJxs4ukw38FD_rzA.
Yongfook.com, have never heard of that site. 206 total links, not much traffic, this one I could pass up. It does have quite a bit of age and “Growth hacking tactics” in the title explicitly, so that would make it tough, but this one is doable to pass up after a while.
https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*FXNrc-YR8rEbVY90.
Alright, so quicksprout is relatively popular, a lot of links, good age, lots of traffic, a few links direct to the page but not a ton.
But the word “tactics” doesn’t even appear here. This page isn’t optimized for this keyword, so I could probably knock it out by being optimized specifically for “growth hacking tactics.”
Let’s jump down a ways to see how hard it would be to get on the front page.
17 total pages indexed? Created in 2014? No links in the index, even to the root URL? This one’s mine. I should be able to front-page easily.
So this looks like a good keyword. Now we just have to get the on-page SEO in place and start building a few links.
(Note: After doing this a few more times I learned that I could probably get austenallred.com toward the top of "growth hacking press," so I changed the on-page optimization of one of those pages to focus on that keyword, and we'll see how it goes.

On-Page SEO

Now that we have our keyword selected, we need to make sure Google knows what our site is about. This is as simple as making sure the right keywords are in the right places. Most of this has to do with html tags, which make up the structure of a webpage. If you don’t know html or understand how it works, just pass this list to a developer and they should be able to help you.
Here is a simple checklist you can follow to see if your content is optimized.

On-Page SEO Checklist

☐ Your keyword is in the tag, ideally at the front (or close to the front) of the tag<br /> ☐ Your keyword is close to the beginning of the <title> tag (ideally the first words)<br /> ☐ The title tag contains less than the viewable limit of 65 characters (optional but recommended)<br /> ☐ Your keyword is in the first <h1> tag (and your page has an <h1> tag)<br /> ☐ If your page contains additional header tags (<h2>, <h3>, etc) your keyword or synonyms are in most of them<br /> ☐ Any images on the page have an <alt> tag that contain your chosen keyword<br /> ☐ Your keyword is in the meta description (and there is a meta description)<br /> ☐ There is at least 300 words of text on the page<br /> ☐ Your keyword appears in the URL (if not the homepage)<br /> ☐ Your keyword appears in the first paragraph of the copy<br /> ☐ Your keyword (or synonyms — Google recognizes them now) is used other times throughout the page<br /> ☐ Your keyword density is between .5% and 2.5%<br /> ☐ The page contains dofollow links to other pages (this just means you’re not using nofollow links to every other page)<br /> ☐ The page is original content not taken from another page and dissimilar from other pages on your site<br /> If you have all of that in place you should be pretty well set from an on-page perspective. You’ll likely be the best-optimized page for your chosen keyword unless you’re in a very competitive space.<br /> All we have left now is off-page optimization.<br /> <h1>Off-Page SEO</h1> Off-Page SEO is just a fancy way to say links. (Sometimes we call them backlinks, but it’s really the same thing.)<br /> Google looks at each link on the web as a weighted vote. If you link to something, in Google’s eyes you’re saying, “This is worth checking out.” The more legit you are the more weight your vote carries.<br /> <h2>Link Juice</h2> SEOs have a weird way to describe this voting process; they call it “link juice.” If an authoritative site, we’ll say Wikipedia for example, links to you, they’re passing you “link juice.”<br /> But link juice doesn’t only work site to site — if your homepage is very authoritative and it links off to other pages on your site, it passes link juice as well. For this reason our link structure becomes very important.<br /> <h3>Checking Link Juice</h3> There are a number of tools that let you check how many links are pointing to a site and what the authority of those pages are. Unfortunately none of them are perfect — the only way to know what links are pointing to your site is to have crawled those pages.<br /> Google crawls most popular pages several times per day, but they don’t want you manipulating them, so they update their index pretty slowly.<br /> That said, you can check at least a sample of Google’s index in the Google Search Console (formerly known as Webmaster Tools). Once you navigate to your site, In the left-hand side select “Search Traffic” then “Links to your site.” There’s a debate raging over whether or not this actually shows you all of the links Google knows about (I’m 99% convinced it’s only a sample), but it’s at least a representative sample.<br /> To see all of your links, click on “More” under “Who links to you the most” then “Download this table.” This, again, seems to only download a sample of what Google knows about. You can also select “Download latest links” which provides more recent links than the other option.<br /> Unfortunately this doesn’t let us see much a to the value of the links, nor does it show us links that have dropped or where those links are from.<br /> To use those there are a wide variety of tools: If you have a budget I’d go with ahrefs.com as they have the biggest index, followed by Moz’s Open Site Explorer (most of the data you can get with a free account, if not then it’s slightly cheaper than ahrefs), and finally SEMrush, which is free for most purposes we need. MajesticSEO uses a combination of “trust flow” and “citation flow” which also works fairly well to give you an idea as to the overall health and number of links pointing to your site.<br /> All of these use different internal metrics to determine the “authority” of a link, but using them to compare apples to apples can be beneficial.<br /> <h1>Link Structure</h1> HTML links look something like this:<br /> <a href=”http://www.somesite.com” title=”keyword”>Anchor text</a><br /> Where <a href="?id=9016">http://www.somesite.com</a> is the place the link directs you to, the title is largely a remnant of time gone by, and the linked text — think the words that are blue and you click on — is called the “anchor text.”<br /> In addition to the amount of link juice a page has, the relevance of the anchor text matters.<br /> Generally speaking you want to use your keyword as the anchor text for your internal linking whenever possible. External linking (from other sites) shouldn’t be very heavily optimized for anchor text. If 90% of your links all have the same anchor text Google can throw a red flag, assuming that you’re doing something fishy.<br /> If you’re ever creating links (like we’ll show you in the future) I only ever use something generic like the site name, “here” or the full URL.<br /> <h2>Internal Structure</h2> Generally speaking you don’t want orphan pages (those that aren’t linked to by other pages), nor do you want an overly-messy link structure.<br /> Some say the ideal link structure for a site is something like this:<br /> <a href="?id=5939">https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*tWHFIzBzG7zq6uii</a>.<br /> That’s close, but it gets a couple things wrong. First, you’ll never have a structure that organized, and second, in an ideal world every page would link to every other page on its same level. This can easily be done with a footer that feels like a sitemap or “recommended” pages. That allows you to specify anchor text, and pass link juice freely from page to page.<br /> Unfortunately it’s impossible to draw such a web without it becoming a mess, so you’ll just have to imagine what that actually looks like.<br /> We have just one more thing to go over before we start getting those first links pointing to our site.<br /> <h3>Robots.txt, disavow, nofollow, and other minutia###</h3> Most of SEO at this point is now managing stuff that can go wrong. There is a lot of that, but we’ll go over what will cover 99% of needs, and you can Google if there’s something really crazy.<br /> <h4>Robots.txt</h4> Almost every site has a page at url.com/robots.txt — even google has one.<br /> This is just a plain text file that lets you tell search engine crawlers what to crawl and not to crawl. Most are pretty good about listening, except the Bingbot, which pretty much does whatever it wants no matter what you tell it. (I’m mostly kidding.)<br /> If you don’t want Google to crawl a page (maybe it’s a login page you don’t want indexed, a landing page, etc.) you can just “disallow” it in your robots.txt by saying disallow: /somepage.<br /> If you add a trailing / to it (e.g. disallow: /somepage/) it will also disallow all child pages.<br /> Technically you can specify different rules for different bots (or user agents), but it’s easiest to start your file with “User-agent: *” if you don’t have a need for separate crawling rules.<br /> <h4>Disavow</h4> Google will penalize spammy sites, and unfortunately this causes some bad behavior from bad actors. Say, for example, you wanted to take out a competitor. You could send a bunch of obviously spammy links to their site and get them penalized. This is called “negative SEO,” and is something that happens often in highly contested keywords. Google generally tries to pretend like it doesn’t happen.<br /> In the case that this does happen, however, you can “Disavow” links in the Search Console, which is pretty much saying, “Hey Google, don’t count this one.” I hope you’ll never have to use it, but if you hire (or have hired) a bad SEO or are being attacked by a competitor, that is how you combat it.<br /> <h4>Nofollow</h4> A link can have a property called “nofollow” such as this:<br /> <a href=”http://www.somesite.com” title=”keyword” rel=”nofollow”>Anchor text</a>.<br /> If you want to link to somebody but you don’t want it to count as a vote (you don’t want to pass link-juice), or you support user-generated content and want to deter spammers, you can use a nofollow link. Google says it discounts the value of those links. I’m not convinced they discount them heavily, but other SEOs are so they seem to deter spammers if nothing else.<br /> <h4>Redirects</h4> If you’re going to change a URL, but you don’t want its link juice to disappear, you can use a 301 redirect. A 301 will pass a majority of the link juice.<br /> Importantly, Google views <a href="?id=3190">www.austenallred.com</a> and austenallred.com as different sites. So decide on one, and redirect all of one type to the other.<br /> <h4>Canonical URLs</h4> If you have two pages that are virtually the same, you can add something like <link rel=”canonical href=”https://www.someurl.com/somepage”> to say “hey, treat this page as if it were that page instead, but I don’t want to 301 it.”<br /> And with that, we’re ready to build our first links.<br /> <h1>Link Building</h1> Link building is where SEO really starts to matter, and where a lot of people end up in a world of hurt.<br /> The best way to build links is to not build links. I’ve worked for companies in the past that don’t have to ask for them, they just flow in from press, customer blogs, their awesome blog posts, etc. If this is an option (and we’ll go over a couple of ways to make it more likely) you’re in a great place.<br /> If not, at least in the beginning, we’re going to manually create just a few.<br /> We’re going to create them in legitimate ways and not hire somebody in India to do so. That is a recipe for disaster, and I can’t even count the number of times I’ve seen that take down a site.<br /> Web 2.0s The easiest way to build high quality links are what SEOs call “web 2.0s.” That’s just a way to say “social sites” or sites that let you post stuff. Now tweeting a link into the abyss won’t do you anything, but profiles, status pages, etc. do carry some weight. And if they come from a popular domain that counts as a link.<br /> Some of the easiest are:<br /> <ul> <li>Twitter (in your bio)<br /></li> <li>Github (the readme of a repo)<br /></li> <li>YouTube (the description of a video — it has to actually get views)<br /></li> <li>Wordpress (yes, you’ll have to actually create a blog)<br /></li> <li>Blogger (same here)<br /></li> <li>Tumblr<br /></li> <li>Upvote-based sites (HackerNews, GrowthHackers, Inbound.org, Reddit, etc.)<br /></li> </ul> If nothing else you can start there and get a half dozen to a dozen links. There are always big lists of “web 2.0s” you can find online, but keep in mind if you’re going to build something out on a blogging platform you’re going to have to really build something out. That’s a lot of content and time, but you have to do it the right way.<br /> We generally keep a bigger list of Web 2.0s here. Some may be out of date, but you should probably only build a half dozen to a dozen Web 2.0s anyway.<br /> <h2>Expired Domains</h2> Another way to get link juice is by purchasing an expired domain. This is more difficult to do, but there are a lot of options such as expireddomains.net. (Google “expired domains” and you’ll find dozens of sites monitoring them.)<br /> You’ll want to purchase a domain that has expired and restore it as closely as you can to its original form using an archive. These sites likely have some link juice to pass on and you can pass it to yourself.<br /> <h2>Link Intersection</h2> Another way to find places you can build links is by using a link intersection tool. These find sites that link to “competitor a” and “competitor b” but not to you. Theoretically, if they link to both of your competitors, they should be willing to link to you. Moz, Ahrefs, LunaMetrics and others have link intersection tools that work quite well.<br /> Now that we have a few basic links flowing, we’re going to work on some strategies that will send continual links and press, eventually getting to a point where we don’t have to build any more links.<br /> <h1>Your First Drip of Traffic — Becoming an Authority Site</h1> Awesome — you have a site that converts well, your SEO is in place, ready for you to drive traffic. Now what?<br /> As you’re probably learned at this point, a site that converts very well but has no traffic flowing to it still converts zero traffic.<br /> We’re going to fix that.<br /> This section takes a lot of time and effort, and in the beginning you’ll likely wonder if you’re doing anything at all. Remember that class in college that is so difficult it’s the point where most people give up, effectively weeding out the people who aren’t ready to major in a specific subject?<br /> <h3>Well this is the weeder-out chapter of growth hacking.</h3> Take a Long-Term View The reason so many people stumble on this step is the same reason people stumble on so many steps that take a little effort under time — losing weight, investing in a 401(k), etc. In the beginning you’re going to have a little seedling of traffic, and you’ll be looking up to those who have giant oak trees, thinking, “I must be doing something wrong.” You’re not doing anything wrong. The traffic starts as a trickle before it becomes a flood.<br /> But don’t worry if you’re a startup. Our goal is to get enough traffic that continuing to do this effort will be sustainable (meaning we won’t die before we start to see the rewards), but at the same time we’re building equity in the Internet.<br /> The type of traffic we want to build is the type that will compound and will never go away. We want to create traffic today that will still give us a little trickle in five years. Combining hundreds (or thousands) of little trickles, our site that converts, and a great product we will create a giant river.<br /> Future chapters will go into depth on the networks we need to drive traffic from, so in this chapter we’re going to focus on traffic that’s network-agnostic. Traffic that we can’t get by tapping any specific network.<br /> Just to give you some idea of scale, I’ve seen this process drive over 500,000 visits per day, though the build up to that level took almost a full year. What could you do with 500,000 visits per day?<br /> <h2>Monitoring Alerts</h2> To start we’re going to use the keywords we found in the SEO chapter, and inject ourselves (and our company) into the conversation wherever it’s taking place.<br /> To do this we’re going to use software called BuzzBundle.<br /> BuzzBundle This software lets us do a few things:<br /> Constantly monitor all mentions of a specific topic, competitor, or keyword across multiple locations on the Internet (from Facebook groups to Quora questions to blog posts) where comments are available Allow us to leave a constructive comment that references our product or company<br /> Disclaimer: This is not the SEO comment spam you’ve seen This step takes thought, effort, and a real human who understands what they’re typing. I don’t often say this, but you cannot effectively automate this step without it becoming spammy. If you’re trying to replicate the automated SEO spam you’ve seen on various blogs and sites this will probably work, but you’ll get banned, your clickthrough will be a fraction of what it could be, and you’ll be banned<br /> <h2>Productive Commenting</h2> We’re not going to fire up some awful software to drop spun mentions of garbage onto various comment sections online hoping that brings us SEO traffic. Our comments must do two things:<br /> <ul> <li>Be contextual. We are only going to talk about the topic presented in an article or tweet, and only mention our company when it naturally fits in<br /></li> <li>Contribute to the conversation. I should learn something or have value added to my life by reading your comment<br /></li> </ul> If you do these two things a few changes will take place: First, you’ll notice that people click on your links because you’re a thoughtful person who likes to contribute. Second, people will respect your company because you’re a thoughtful person who likes to contribute.<br /> And with that disclaimer, we’ll move on to the nitty gritty of how this is done. Let’s fire up BuzzBundle and get to work.<br /> <h2>Accounts and Personas</h2> The first thing you’ll want to do in BuzzBundle is go to Accounts -> Add new accounts. This is the starting point for everything we’ll do, as we need accounts to comment.<br /> One thing you’ll notice about BuzzBundle is that it lets you use multiple accounts. I find it beneficial to think from multiple perspectives and therefore multiple points of view, but I don’t want to go too far overboard and be spammy.<br /> I’d recommend doing something simple — create 2–3 personas, each of whom you identify with (or are you), and enter them into your BuzzBundle accounts.<br /> Personally I don’t even change my name, I just use a different one (eg. Austen J. Allred vs. Austen Allred) or use a few photos, just so it isn’t literally the same name and same photo blanketing the Internet.<br /> <h4>Disqus</h4> Disqus is a comment system used all over the place, and it carries some caveates. Disqus will ban you if you use the same link in every post, so there are two workarounds:<br /> Use a lot of different accounts, rotating IPs or using a proxy every two days or so Use your site URL as your “display name”<br /> Both of these work, but the second one is much easier in my view.<br /> <h2>UTM Parameters</h2> Using links with our UTM parameters here will be very beneficial. We’ll be able to track traffic back to each individual blog or site, and if necessary double down on the ones that are driving traffic.<br /> Link Shorteners If you ever start to run into problems with getting your link posted, it may be useful to use a few link shorteners or some 301 redirects.<br /> To keep it simple you can use a link shortener that 301s such as bit.ly, or if you want to spend a little more time you can set up your own site and 301 the traffic from a certain page to your money site.<br /> <h2>Using BuzzBundle</h2> Let’s get started with the BuzzBundle.<br /> First, it’s going to ask you for a keyword. We already have a keyword from the SEO section, but we may want to do something even a bit more generic. For this one I’m going to go with “growth hacking.”<br /> Simply hit “go” and let BuzzBundle get started.<br /> It will load different content types into different columns, but generally we are going to be scrolling through until we find something that looks compelling and like we can actually contribute to.<br /> The first thing I clicked on was this:<br /> <a href="?id=7786">https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*FtoN2kYmo5y3Oc1w</a>.<br /> It’s a review of another book about growth hacking. All I had to do was comment, tag the author, ask him if he were willing to review our book, and offer to send him one for free. (If you’re that person reading this now it’s going to be pretty awkward).<br /> My assumption is this person will find the conversation to be completely authentic, because it is. When you're authentically reaching out to people you get rid of all of the icky-ickyThe fact that there’s now a link on his video that people who are searching for something else will find is just an added bonus.<br /> As an aside, I much prefer to hold “shift” and click on a link to open it in my normal browser if I’m just going to be commenting as myself.<br /> The next one I found was a roundup of great growth hacking blog posts from the week.<br /> I left the following comment:<br /> <a href="?id=5054">https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/800/0*m-1C10p2aY9Ymjjz</a>.<br /> Note how I followed him on Twitter so that it’s obviously personal and not an automated spam comment. I even went a little bit overboard and tweeted at him just for kicks.<br /> That is how you get people on your team.<br /> As you get further along and have an idea of how to get a good response, I’d recommend starting to sort by reach, ramping up the number of keywords you’re searching for, and possibly even -gasp- upgrading to the paid version of BuzzBundle.<br /> </div> submitted by <a href="?id=14809"> tianan </a> to <a href="?id=7264"> Entrepreneur </a> <span><a href="?id=1861">[link]</a></span> <span><a href="?id=892">[comments]</a></span></p> <h5>A meandering, long-form case study: month 1!</h5> <p><div class="md">Hey <a href="?id=8309">juststart</a> — welcome to month #1. Unlike other, wonderful case studies this will be largely long-form and a narrative of the small decisions and sequences that can make up launching an affiliate site. I offer it to add variety.<br /> My goal: to make $10k in my 12th month.<br /> <h3>About me</h3> I’m mid 20’s, dude, former political consultant who got burned out back in 2017 after working on a special election. I’ve worked as a programmer, digital canvas coordinator, team lead, strategic consultant, etc. <br /> I have absolutely no experience in affiliate marketing other than doing arbitrage as a 13-year-old between eBay & Amazon. I have no experience writing copy. I have extensive experience starting up companies and selling them.<br /> I now work in the entertainment industry in California. <br /> I am transitioning into affiliate marketing because my wife & I are planning a child and I want to have a lifestyle where I can spend lots of time with my kids while we’re all young.<br /> I highly value my own time, so hopefully we’ll see a transition over the next 12 months where I am able to outsource most of my labor. <br /> I hope to be working on this project for 10 hours a week at the end of the year. I plan on starting by working 60+ hours a week.<br /> <h3>A grand experiment</h3> I’ve learned a lot from the case studies of others. I’m hoping in the future others will gain some knowledge from my mistakes so they aren’t required to repeat them.<br /> My view of this field is it’s large enough for us all to help one another out without having to worry about competition or envy. <br /> I love how oriented this sub is toward just getting out there and learning through experience, it completely meshes with my own philosophies of self-education and experimentation.<br /> With that said, this case study, my approach to my niche, and how I’ll approach other affiliate marketers is going to be a <strong>grand experiment</strong> in tit-for-tat altruism. <br /> I honestly believe that if I seek to collaborate with everyone and provide them real value that I’ll make faster progress than those who desperately squirrel away their knowledge and never have the opportunity for it to be corrected or supplemented. So I’m also a bit self-interested here.<br /> <h3>My first month</h3> I knew nothing about what I wanted to do and I manage my time terribly, so I first set out to correct both of those things. <br /> My journey started by re-reading a book that moved me a number of years ago when I was looking to play Go competitively, “The Art of Learning” by Josh Waitzkin. I was checking in on what Josh was up to when I found an interview he did with Timothy Ferriss. <br /> I’m sure most of you know who Timothy Ferriss is. I didn’t. I knew of him, but wrote him off as some bro-ie podcaster who was scamming people through fitness supplements, which is maybe 8% true. <br /> I listened to <a href="?id=2619">the interview with Josh</a> and my way of thinking about my work started reorganizing. <br /> I immediately downloaded the first four Tim Ferriss books and read them over the next 20 hours, using Anki & skimming to <a href="?id=10993">80/20</a> the content. <br /> I applied Tim’s philosophy to his own work, and then acquired the following books to skim and pull best practices out of:<br /> <ul> <li>The 80/20 Principle (Richard Koch)</li> <li>The E-Myth Revisited (Michael Gerber)</li> <li>Zero to One (Peter Thiel)</li> <li>The $100 Startup (Chris Guillebeau)</li> <li>The Checklist Manifesto (Atul Gawande) <— changed my life</li> <li>The Boron Letters (Gary Halbert)</li> <li>The Start-Up of You (Reid Hoffman)</li> <li>Tao Te Ching (trans. Stephen Mitchell)</li> </ul> and a few others. If people are interested, I’ll post the entire list. <br /> I 80/20’d these within the next 30 hours, drinking coffee and taking extensive notes that I could learn over the next month using spaced repetition w/ Anki. This is probably a good point to mention that I had been working as an actor and memorization comes very easily to me now after practicing it substantially. <br /> If you aren’t a fast reader or capable of memorizing, you should first ask yourself how much time you spend on improving those skills. If you spend a lot of time with little results, I’d focus more on skimming or other ways of reducing the time you spend with a book. Most of a book is trying to get to ~180 pages so that it can be packaged and sold, my goal in reading is to extract 90% of its use in around 10% of the time (80/20, etc.). <br /> This is <strong>day 2.5</strong> and I still don’t know that I’m going to do affiliate marketing, just that I need to quit doing what I’m doing now because it can’t be scaled without my participation. <br /> I now had a play to work on, so I did nothing but listen to podcasts for the next week. <br /> It’s <strong>day 12</strong>. <br /> I had a list of ideas and asked my wife for her feedback. I proposed 6 different start-ups, a few drop-shipping ideas, and affiliate marketing.<br /> AM required the most time but the least money, and because we’re saving just about everything we have right now for a cushion/babe, AM won.<br /> Now I repeating what I had done in those first 48 hours, I read absolutely everything I could about AM. I mean everything. <br /> BHW, this sub, a few other less useful reddit subs (coughcough), backlinko, ahrefs, quicksprout, moz, AH, and case-study-after-case-study. I archived everything and took actionable notes. I used Evernote and created 20 notebooks to separate different aspects of AM. <br /> Because this is <a href="?id=10649">juststart</a>, I also decided to only give myself 48 hours to research the model and to pick a niche. <br /> Everything I do will be experimental. <br /> I am going to start with a single site, and launch sites 2 & 3 during my third month. <br /> I will A/B test different approaches to on-site and off-site SEO between the sites and the pages on each site and share the outcomes of those experiments here.<br /> I purchased a 7 day sub to ahrefs, did my kw research, and narrowed it down to 7 niches. <br /> I picked the most narrow and least competitive of the niches based on the principles of creating minimal viable products (MVPs) and a lesson learned from <a href="?id=2611">Gary Halbert</a>. <br /> If I fail here, I won’t have to worry that I picked a niche that was too competitive, or that I went too broad. I may cap out quickly because of my niche selection, but I’ll at least be capable of capping out.<br /> I went into this with these principles:<br /> <ul> <li>I’ll go under my real name for building relationships</li> <li>I will be the greatest authority in my niche (I’m hyper competitive)</li> <li>I will create better, longer content than my competitors</li> <li>I will only use whitehat techniques for ranking this site</li> <li>I will not use a pmd/emd and I’ll give myself room to grow in my vertical</li> <li>I will write 40k words of content a month until my niche is populated</li> <li>Content will only be money content aimed at buyer intent keywords or info content aimed at BLs</li> </ul> The best advice I could give you is to listen to every AH podcast at 2x speed and read every comment written by <a href="?id=7315">u/bprs07</a>, except for the ones in the Celtics sub because, well, reasons.<br /> It’s now <strong>day 14</strong>, I have a niche, it’s in the outdoors vertical.<br /> I spend the next 48 hours working on this checklist:<br /> <ul> <li>choose a domain, set it up with SSL</li> <li>set up Amazon affiliate account</li> <li>install & configure WP </li> <li>buy/configure a theme</li> <li>configure plugins</li> <li>set up google analytics/search console</li> <li>reserve social media</li> <li>map out content for the next month</li> </ul> I also reach out to three people I highly respect, letting them know that I appreciated the knowledge they shared and also asking a single question that I was having trouble answering. I received 2 out of 3 responses, and left the door open for future questions in the future.<br /> My goal is to form a group that I can ping in the future for issues that I cannot solve any other way. I know that I’ll wait at least two months before contacting them again, because I want to have something of value to offer when I next ask for help.<br /> I finish the above list, it’s day 16, time to do what most people put off: writing the content.<br /> I hope to outsource this in the future, but I want to get it right from the start and learn about writing copy so that I can interface with copywriters in the future.<br /> I spend <strong>days 16-20</strong> writing 30k words of content. Each article is the best or close to the best on the subject it covers. I had to learn a lot about my niche during this time so writing took longer than it normally would. For instance, I had no idea how to make a campfire, that’s how far-removed I am.<br /> I looked at the most successful sites and assumed what they were doing was right in terms of copywriting & on-page SEO. I performed 10 case studies of 10 different sites outside of my niche, analyzing and breaking down every aspect of their design/keyword selection/BLs. <br /> I highly suggest everyone do this for themselves, it’s eye-opening how many different approaches there are and that some very basic things are basically done only one way.<br /> I was told that Pinterest isn’t great for male-oriented niches, but I wanted to experiment because I looked at the user growth for Pinterest and saw that it was acquiring a lot of men, and there wasn’t as much competition for their traffic.<br /> Pinterest is like Google in a lot of ways, that the traffic starts slow and builds up over time. <br /> Not for me.<br /> I accidentally created a viral pin and started driving 100 hits a day. I am hopeful that the social proof voodoo is real and that Google takes note and accelerates my pages to the front page. My mistake was I didn’t have any affiliate content up, because I was still trying to build BLs.<br /> I’m now on <strong>day 22</strong>, and I have my first set of content completed. Google isn’t ranking me on the front page yet and I can see why a lot of people quit at this point.<br /> My competitors seem to use PBNs, so I’m pretty sure I can outrank them if I take the slower path and build consistent link velocity. <br /> Having finished my most recent play, I take a 3-month break from theatre, auditioning, and classes.<br /> Rest of the month:<br /> <ul> <li>Send 100 skyscraper emails for my info articles</li> <li>Finish niche research for sites 2 & 3, only one of them will be an Amazon affiliate site</li> <li>Register domains for those sites, throw a single article up on each to get them aging</li> </ul> The on-page SEO stuff I’m all doing is so basic that you can find it on moz/backlinko/AH so I didn’t bother going into details.<br /> <h3>Issues I’ve had:</h3> <ul> <li>Building up a social media following outside of Pinterest so that I have sufficient social proof to compellingly outreach. </li> </ul> It’s actually blocked me on sending these emails because I worry that if I just wait another week I’ll have a much higher success rate, but I’ve spent way too much time trying to build up a social media following. I’ve tried basically everything, paid advertising, pushing content, follower churn. I probably slowed myself down by trying too many things and getting temporarily shadow-banned on a few platforms.<br /> <ul> <li>I’m worried about competitors just outright stealing my content and duping it before it has a chance to rank. </li> </ul> This isn’t something I’ve seen a lot of people write about. What I’ve done to try to prevent that is uncover the real identities of the other sites in my niche (many of them are guys who write under their real names, but some aren’t) so that if my content is taken I have a person to send a cease-and-desist to. <br /> <ul> <li>I’m not getting very much organic traffic.</li> </ul> This is typical, but I’m still in that free-fall stage where I’ve jumped off the cliff and I’m not sure if my parachute will deploy.<br /> <h3>Goals for next month</h3> <ul> <li>Write 40k words, double my content to 80k. I luckily write at ~140 WPM (slower when I’m researching/formatting) so it’s just a matter of keeping my interest in the task at hand. I use a picture of my wife to motivate me because I know I’m doing this for the future. Sappy, but whatever works.<br /></li> <li>Reach out to the other affiliate sites in my niche, try to form a positive, mutually beneficial relationship of friendly competition.<br /></li> <li>Build BLs.<br /></li> <li>Have my other two niches/domains figured out, mapped, and registered<br /></li> <li>Start a Web 2.0 PBN for powering one of the two new sites, as an experiment<br /></li> </ul> <h3>Money and tools</h3> Expenses:<br /> <ul> <li>Domain: $8</li> <li>Hosting: $0.00 (I have a large credit with a VPS reseller)</li> <li>Theme: $120</li> <li>ahrefs: $106.00 (first 37 days)</li> <li>Month 1 Total: $234</li> <li>Site 1 Total: $234</li> </ul> Revenue:<br /> <ul> <li>Month 1 Total: $0</li> <li>Site 1 Total: $0</li> </ul> Net income:<br /> <ul> <li>Month 1 Total: ($234)</li> <li>Site 1 Total: ($234)</li> </ul> Tools that I’m using:<br /> <ul> <li>Majestic</li> <li>Moz</li> <li>ahrefs</li> <li>tailwind</li> <li>Buzzstream</li> </ul> Tools that I want:<br /> <ul> <li>Scrapebox (expired domains/web 2.0s)</li> <li>AH Pro membership (for access to their facebook group alone)</li> </ul> <h3>Stats</h3> <ul> <li>Direct taffic: 0 (just me & a few scrapers)</li> <li>Social traffic: 650</li> <li>Organic traffic : 105</li> <li>Referral traffic: 20</li> <li>Bounce rate: 60%</li> <li>Search CTR: 3% (this one scares me, but I think I understand why it's so low)</li> <li>Session duration: 3:01</li> <li>Words: 40,000</li> <li>Articles: 10</li> </ul> An aside:<br /> I had a really funny experience with <a href="?id=1591">AH</a>. <br /> I watched one of their webinars a week ago, which was a pretty good recap of things I already knew. <br /> But, get this, it was set up so that all of the chat was simulated and they were pretending in a pre-recorded message to be responding to the questions they were getting.<br /> They had fake purchases that would show up, etc. and really, really tried to hard sell at the end: “why are you even watching this if you aren’t serious enough to pay $500?” “why did you waste your time?” things like that. <br /> I had never experienced being this close to the end of a sales funnel before and it was actually disappointing to see them using these transparently ineffective psychological techniques to get their potential customers to commit. <br /> They're so straightforward about everything else they do that I was really surprised and bummed out. Anyway, I still recommend their podcast/blog, but be careful out there.<br /> If you guys have any questions, let me know. I tried not to just rattle off a list of plugins/stats but instead offer a different insight into the affiliate marketing world. Still not sure if it will be useful to anyone else, but writing it out should hold me accountable in the future.<br /> If it ever seems like I’m doing something terribly wrong, let me know and I’ll try to test out your alternative! <br /> </div> submitted by <a href="?id=15274"> akurik </a> to <a href="?id=5932"> juststart </a> <span><a href="?id=13353">[link]</a></span> <span><a href="?id=2863">[comments]</a></span></p> <h5>New client: How to boost a news site's traffic? repost from /r/bigseo</h5> <p><div class="md">Hi guys!<br />  <br /> I'm from Hungary, my company is doing SEO for more than 3 years, we were doing mainly affiliate marketing and local SEO. This week while doing outreach for a Plastic Surgery I gained a potentially new client.<br />  <br /> They are an online and offline magazine, the official paper of the Hungarian Chamber of Pharmacists, so it's a well written, decent paper, but they have no idea about online presence. I met with their online sales manager guy, her only goal is to increase their online traffic, so they can increase their revenue by selling ads.<br />  <br /> I never done such thing before, we were focusing mainly on "traditional" SEO. This is the webpage, if you check it in Ahref or Majestic it's pretty decent. (but you won't understand it, because it's in Hungarian: <a href="?id=11734">http://www.patikamagazin.hu/</a> ). The website is a mess, it's not looking good, they are not using any interlinks, it's no wonder they don't have many readers. <br />  <br /> So my question is: what can a SEO specialist offer them as service, how can I grow their online traffic. As you can imagine, they don't have a tech guy, so they are willing to pay good money for anything that seems useful. We don't have the capacity to make a whole new webpage for such a big portal, we were mainly doing small WordPress pages. Also, I don't see such a big potential in growing their social media presence, it's not my area of expertise, also it takes forever and I don't want 1 of my guy to hang on Facebook all day.<br />  <br /> I was thinking about:<br /> <ul> <li>Creating a newsletter service for them.<br /></li> <li>The website is pretty strong so it would easily rank for popular KW-s. I'm thinking about doing a KW research and "jump-start" their traffic by boosting some articles.<br /></li> <li>Restructuring the website, make the popular articles more easily accessible. Checking out their popular article and why they are popular. How do I do that? I used heat map before, but for such a big site it's a pain in the ass. I don't know if simple google analytics is enough.<br /></li> <li>Interlinking their articles. They don't use interlinks at all. With more interlinks, people would stay longer on their site. My problem is, I don't really know how I can check what to link where effectively in a site which has hundreds of articles.<br /></li> </ul>  <br /> What do you think guys, do you have any experience in that field? Any more idea? Any help would be appreciated!<br /> </div> submitted by <a href="?id=4501"> sarahunter </a> to <a href="?id=7261"> SEO </a> <span><a href="?id=8610">[link]</a></span> <span><a href="?id=7812">[comments]</a></span></p> <h5>The 10 Best SEO Tools of 2016 (post from /marketing)</h5> <p><div class="md"><strong>TL;DR:</strong> If you just want the list of 10 you can go to the end where I list them and provide links to their sites. The majority of these are free to use and have paid versions with extra features while others are paid versions but offer free trails for you to try them out before making a decision on if you like them enough to pay. So this is from an article I released a couple days ago on my own personal blog for aspiring entrepreneurs <a href="?id=3722">The Legit Society</a> so I hope you guys find it helpful here on /marketing. The majority of these tools are free to use and offer extra features for paid versions or limit the stuff you can see on the free versions. I do recommend signing up for free accounts at least since it provides extra perks on most of them. Some are monthly paid while some are 1-time payment for lifetime use (Market Samurai) but even the monthly subscriptions offer trials so try them out and see what works for you. I would highly recommend you check out my site afterwards if you have time but I won't be one of those that only provide 3 words and link you to the site for the rest. This is the ENTIRE article for ya. Everything on my own site is free as well so I hope you guys find it helpful.<br /> I wanted to go and make a list of the top 10 SEO tools that I use over the last year and the ones I will continue to use this year. The following tools have helped my marketing campaigns for the startups I work for, my own companies and consultations I have done for other sites as well. I vouch personally for every single one of the following tools and the only one I will offer through an affiliate offer is the Market Samurai because it is the only one that I have an affiliate program with. The rest are just out of the great power of the tools themselves. If you wish to purchase the paid versions of these tools go ahead but they provide free versions that do just as well for what I use them for. If you decide to use any of these please leave a comment on what you think about it. <br /> This was a hard 10 tools to narrow down because I use a lot more tools for my SEO than just the following 10 but I decided to narrow it down for the BEST of the best only and so I ended with the top 10 tools for SEO for 2016 marketers. I hope it provides you help in your own marketing jobs. If you have anything to say about any of these top 10 choices, for or against any of them please leave a comment as I would love to have a conversation about why the tools are great or not, depending on how others feel about them. To me, though, they are AMAZING!<br /> <ol> <li>[AHREFS](htt[://<a href="?id=5225">www.ahrefs.com</a>) – The NUMBER 1 tool in my toolbox. This is amazing. I use the standard account but had their freebie account after awhile when I was low on funds and was able to track 1 site on my dashboard. With my standard, I could do up to 5 sites which were enough to manage ALL my current client’s accounts but the limit on a number of keywords I could track hurt me. I wish I could have tracked the amount they allowed PER account you track on the dashboard but it's for all your accounts so you may be limited there. Besides that their Content, Positions, Dashboard and other tabs are beyond amazing for seeing the status of some SEO and online marketing of a site's health for the past year or so. It shows so much information from anchor text to domains linking in (gained and lost) per day/week/month over the entire last year. You can see a number of keywords you rank for overall. The entire site is a blessing. A truly amazing tool.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=1197">Majestic</a> – A GREAT tool for checking your backlinks, your trust and content rating and overall tracking domains, links and such for any website. Its shows you what links you gain over time, some during the last few months while some go back up 5 years! Their FRESH ratings are amazing. I created an account and use the free version and it provides enough data though I believe a paid account is required eventually once you start getting serious about your site’s marketing and SEO plan. That or if you do consult in SEO and marketing for other sites then this is definitely a must.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=13754">Moz</a>/<a href="?id=11597">Open Site Explorer</a> – Best overall SEO tool for your site analysis and keeping track over keywords, content, page strength and overall site health. Their Open Site Explorer is AMAZING at seeing your competition's backlink strategies and seeing your own backlinks. Create an account with Moz and you can export the information in .CSV format, which is a MUST! Do I go as far as saying you NEED an account with Moz? No, if you do not have the money to do so then skip it as you can get by without it for awhile, but eventually you WILL need to get a paid Moz account to take your SEO game to the next level if you take your site seriously.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=4042">Market Samurai</a>/<a href="?id=14587">Non-Affiliate Link</a> – Best tool for Keyword analysis and building your keyword strategy. The price tag may seem steep $150 for life but use it for the 14-day trial and tell me that you will not miss it after day 15. Trust me if you plan your 14 days of trail use with the correct strategy in mind you will gain SO much from those 14 days ALONE. Imagine being able to do that at ANYTIME and you will pay that $150 in no time. I know I did.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=11959">YOAST SEO</a> – The de facto SEO plugin for any Wordpress site. They will help you get your SEO setup on EVERY single page for your site by rating the SEO strength of the pages on a red, orange, yellow or green rating which is great! They also provide you with great advice on how to increase SEO of each page. They also offer other options for SEO, which I would not be able to live without after using them now. They are amazing and at the end of the day they are FREE!!!! Yes, crazy I know. I don’t know how some of these companies make money but they must somehow.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=15202">Google’s Keyword Planner Tool</a> – Obviously, the end all, be all tool for checking keywords and planning your keyword strategy but it helps also once you start looking into a paid campaigns and seeing what’s worth it and what is not. I love seeing the trends, the competition, the difficulty of certain words PLUS the search volume of each word per month I believe. You can look at as many keywords as you want for free once you have an AdSense/AdWords account even if you don’t have any paid campaigns.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=5282">SumoMe Plugin</a> – I use this plugin on ALL my sites and ALL my client’s accounts if they have Wordpress since it is a free Wordpress plugin that provides some AMAZING tools and capabilities. You can setup popup slide boxes that appear on certain pages to get email subscribers and connect that with your MailChimp or many other email list providers. You can setup Heat Maps for free on EVERY single page on your site. You can setup Content Analysis on ever single page on your site for free which shows you how much percent of that page the average viewer reads which is great for bloggers. They also offer some other tools such as the Welcome Mat, Discovery, and the Share option, which is the best of the three since it allows you to put share buttons on your social profiles on certain pages or articles. They offer SO much for free I don’t know how they make money but they do have Freemium options and offer extra features for paid so I am sure enough of their users pay for the extra options but this plugin is a MUST for any Wordpress site.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=15032">SEOQuake Chrome Extension</a> - A great extension to have on your Chrome browser who provides amazing information on any site you use it on. It sometimes does some weird stuff such as striking a line through hyperlinks on certain sites, which I am not sure they are aware of but if you are ok with putting up with that than their extension/plugin is a must. It is great for spying on the competition and seeing what they are doing. Basically, once you turn this on and start going through Google or any other search engine you will have a new row appear under each new site that appears which shows you their Page Rank, # of pages indexed by Google, # of backlinks they have (L = web page, LD = domain) # of web pages indexed by Bing, overall rank and the domain age. All information you would need to easily gauge sites overall strength. Use it while looking at target keywords you have and see the competition and how hard it would be to knock em out. Do it this way or use Market Samurai, which is basically doing the exact same thing for you plus WAY MORE! This is just the free way to do it ;).<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=1644">HootSuite</a> – Obviously, the best tool for managing your social media accounts. Nothing else to say. Use the free options if you wish to save money or be fancy and get the paid versions to get extra options, which are worth the extra money spent. I use it to manage all social accounts for every single job I have ever been a part of including my personal accounts and sites.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=5501">SEMRush</a> – One of the best software competitors out there for keyword research, domain research, competitor research and site audits. What more could you ask for? For keyword research alone you get the monthly search volume, total indexed pages of the top rankers, cost per click for PPC campaigns, the competitiveness of the keyword, phrase matches, and related keywords. That right there should be enough to make any marketing director jump ship from any other software and get on SEMRush’s boat? For domain research, we can see traffic sites get, through organic and paid avenues, Total traffic brought in through backlinks. Graphs showing 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and all time organic/paid sources. Top 5 organic keywords bringing in traffic and top keywords helping that site out. On top of that, you get anchor text for most backlinks, referring domains, the competitive position of that sites for ads and PPC campaigns, plus the most popular indexed pages of that site. If that doesn’t tickle your fancy, I don’t know what will. Now compare that with your competitor’s site and you get the competition analysis as well as site audit features. This enough makes it one of the top tools for SEO of ALL TIME. <br /></li> </ol> Trust me all of these programs, extensions, plugins, sites, pay for themselves 100x over by the amazing data and help they provide for us marketers and SEO experts/specialists. I would not be able to live without these amazing tools and I recommend you try all of them at least once before deciding to make a choice on them. I am more than sure you will end up stay using them because they are AMAZING tools. They really are. Enough said.<br /> *The link for Market Samurai is an affiliate link and is the only affiliate program that I have with any of the above SEO tools. You can use the non-affiliate link followed right after the affiliate link through any affiliate helps my site continues to operate since I make no money through The Legit $ociety and use it as a hobby project to help aspiring entrepreneurs and not to make money. <br /> TL;DR: <br /> <ol> <li><a href="?id=2969">AHREFs</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=15382">Majestic</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=7226">Moz</a> and <a href="?id=1983">Open Site Explorer</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=2375">Market Samurai</a>/<a href="?id=15157">Non-Affiliate Link</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=14736">YOAST SEO</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=6737">Google’s Keyword Planner Tool</a> <-Read the part on this one if you want to learn how to use it for free since it now requires you to have an AdWords account to use. I give you help on how to get by that requirement without actually having to pay so I recommend you at least read that one up there.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=6197">SumoMe Plugin</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=3639">SEOQuake Chrome Extension</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=1812">HootSuite</a> <br /></li> <li><a href="?id=3266">SEMRush</a><br /></li> </ol> <strong>Some Bonus mentions:</strong> <a href="?id=12402">SpyFu</a>, <a href="?id=9670">Keyword.io</a>, <a href="?id=8984">Google Analytics</a> (of course), <a href="?id=10818">Alexa</a>, <a href="?id=7832">BuzzSumo</a>, and <a href="?id=15105">DeepCrawl</a>.<br /> I hope this post is of some use to you guys/gals.<br /> -Alving J. Garcia Marcano (Blogger @ The Legit Society - <a href="?id=4830">http://www.thelegitblog.com</a>)<br /> </div> submitted by <a href="?id=14048"> alvingjgarcia </a> to <a href="?id=12776"> digital_marketing </a> <span><a href="?id=6368">[link]</a></span> <span><a href="?id=3111">[comments]</a></span></p> <h5>The Top 10 Best SEO Tools of 2016 (My Opinion)</h5> <p><div class="md"><strong>TL;DR:</strong> If you just want the list of 10 you can go to the end where I list them and provide links to their sites. The majority of these are free to use and have paid versions with extra features while others are paid versions but offer free trails for you to try them out before making a decision on if you like them enough to pay. So this is from an article I released a couple days ago on my own personal blog for aspiring entrepreneurs <a href="?id=14049">The Legit Society</a> so I hope you guys find it helpful here on /marketing. The majority of these tools are free to use and offer extra features for paid versions or limit the stuff you can see on the free versions. I do recommend signing up for free accounts at least since it provides extra perks on most of them. Some are monthly paid while some are 1-time payment for lifetime use (Market Samurai) but even the monthly subscriptions offer trials so try them out and see what works for you. I would highly recommend you check out my site afterwards if you have time but I won't be one of those that only provide 3 words and link you to the site for the rest. This is the ENTIRE article for ya. Everything on my own site is free as well so I hope you guys find it helpful.<br /> I wanted to go and make a list of the top 10 SEO tools that I use over the last year and the ones I will continue to use this year. The following tools have helped my marketing campaigns for the startups I work for, my own companies and consultations I have done for other sites as well. I vouch personally for every single one of the following tools and the only one I will offer through an affiliate offer is the Market Samurai because it is the only one that I have an affiliate program with. The rest are just out of the great power of the tools themselves. If you wish to purchase the paid versions of these tools go ahead but they provide free versions that do just as well for what I use them for. If you decide to use any of these please leave a comment on what you think about it. <br /> This was a hard 10 tools to narrow down because I use a lot more tools for my SEO than just the following 10 but I decided to narrow it down for the BEST of the best only and so I ended with the top 10 tools for SEO for 2016 marketers. I hope it provides you help in your own marketing jobs. If you have anything to say about any of these top 10 choices, for or against any of them please leave a comment as I would love to have a conversation about why the tools are great or not, depending on how others feel about them. To me, though, they are AMAZING!<br /> <ol> <li>[AHREFS](htt[://<a href="?id=708">www.ahrefs.com</a>) – The NUMBER 1 tool in my toolbox. This is amazing. I use the standard account but had their freebie account after awhile when I was low on funds and was able to track 1 site on my dashboard. With my standard, I could do up to 5 sites which were enough to manage ALL my current client’s accounts but the limit on a number of keywords I could track hurt me. I wish I could have tracked the amount they allowed PER account you track on the dashboard but it's for all your accounts so you may be limited there. Besides that their Content, Positions, Dashboard and other tabs are beyond amazing for seeing the status of some SEO and online marketing of a site's health for the past year or so. It shows so much information from anchor text to domains linking in (gained and lost) per day/week/month over the entire last year. You can see a number of keywords you rank for overall. The entire site is a blessing. A truly amazing tool.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=10397">Majestic</a> – A GREAT tool for checking your backlinks, your trust and content rating and overall tracking domains, links and such for any website. Its shows you what links you gain over time, some during the last few months while some go back up 5 years! Their FRESH ratings are amazing. I created an account and use the free version and it provides enough data though I believe a paid account is required eventually once you start getting serious about your site’s marketing and SEO plan. That or if you do consult in SEO and marketing for other sites then this is definitely a must.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=1460">Moz</a>/<a href="?id=12623">Open Site Explorer</a> – Best overall SEO tool for your site analysis and keeping track over keywords, content, page strength and overall site health. Their Open Site Explorer is AMAZING at seeing your competition's backlink strategies and seeing your own backlinks. Create an account with Moz and you can export the information in .CSV format, which is a MUST! Do I go as far as saying you NEED an account with Moz? No, if you do not have the money to do so then skip it as you can get by without it for awhile, but eventually you WILL need to get a paid Moz account to take your SEO game to the next level if you take your site seriously.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=11478">Market Samurai</a>/<a href="?id=9632">Non-Affiliate Link</a> – Best tool for Keyword analysis and building your keyword strategy. The price tag may seem steep $150 for life but use it for the 14-day trial and tell me that you will not miss it after day 15. Trust me if you plan your 14 days of trail use with the correct strategy in mind you will gain SO much from those 14 days ALONE. Imagine being able to do that at ANYTIME and you will pay that $150 in no time. I know I did.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=1565">YOAST SEO</a> – The de facto SEO plugin for any Wordpress site. They will help you get your SEO setup on EVERY single page for your site by rating the SEO strength of the pages on a red, orange, yellow or green rating which is great! They also provide you with great advice on how to increase SEO of each page. They also offer other options for SEO, which I would not be able to live without after using them now. They are amazing and at the end of the day they are FREE!!!! Yes, crazy I know. I don’t know how some of these companies make money but they must somehow.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=1047">Google’s Keyword Planner Tool</a> – Obviously, the end all, be all tool for checking keywords and planning your keyword strategy but it helps also once you start looking into a paid campaigns and seeing what’s worth it and what is not. I love seeing the trends, the competition, the difficulty of certain words PLUS the search volume of each word per month I believe. You can look at as many keywords as you want for free once you have an AdSense/AdWords account even if you don’t have any paid campaigns.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=4605">SumoMe Plugin</a> – I use this plugin on ALL my sites and ALL my client’s accounts if they have Wordpress since it is a free Wordpress plugin that provides some AMAZING tools and capabilities. You can setup popup slide boxes that appear on certain pages to get email subscribers and connect that with your MailChimp or many other email list providers. You can setup Heat Maps for free on EVERY single page on your site. You can setup Content Analysis on ever single page on your site for free which shows you how much percent of that page the average viewer reads which is great for bloggers. They also offer some other tools such as the Welcome Mat, Discovery, and the Share option, which is the best of the three since it allows you to put share buttons on your social profiles on certain pages or articles. They offer SO much for free I don’t know how they make money but they do have Freemium options and offer extra features for paid so I am sure enough of their users pay for the extra options but this plugin is a MUST for any Wordpress site.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=12337">SEOQuake Chrome Extension</a> - A great extension to have on your Chrome browser who provides amazing information on any site you use it on. It sometimes does some weird stuff such as striking a line through hyperlinks on certain sites, which I am not sure they are aware of but if you are ok with putting up with that than their extension/plugin is a must. It is great for spying on the competition and seeing what they are doing. Basically, once you turn this on and start going through Google or any other search engine you will have a new row appear under each new site that appears which shows you their Page Rank, # of pages indexed by Google, # of backlinks they have (L = web page, LD = domain) # of web pages indexed by Bing, overall rank and the domain age. All information you would need to easily gauge sites overall strength. Use it while looking at target keywords you have and see the competition and how hard it would be to knock em out. Do it this way or use Market Samurai, which is basically doing the exact same thing for you plus WAY MORE! This is just the free way to do it ;).<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=3038">HootSuite</a> – Obviously, the best tool for managing your social media accounts. Nothing else to say. Use the free options if you wish to save money or be fancy and get the paid versions to get extra options, which are worth the extra money spent. I use it to manage all social accounts for every single job I have ever been a part of including my personal accounts and sites.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=14741">SEMRush</a> – One of the best software competitors out there for keyword research, domain research, competitor research and site audits. What more could you ask for? For keyword research alone you get the monthly search volume, total indexed pages of the top rankers, cost per click for PPC campaigns, the competitiveness of the keyword, phrase matches, and related keywords. That right there should be enough to make any marketing director jump ship from any other software and get on SEMRush’s boat? For domain research, we can see traffic sites get, through organic and paid avenues, Total traffic brought in through backlinks. Graphs showing 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years and all time organic/paid sources. Top 5 organic keywords bringing in traffic and top keywords helping that site out. On top of that, you get anchor text for most backlinks, referring domains, the competitive position of that sites for ads and PPC campaigns, plus the most popular indexed pages of that site. If that doesn’t tickle your fancy, I don’t know what will. Now compare that with your competitor’s site and you get the competition analysis as well as site audit features. This enough makes it one of the top tools for SEO of ALL TIME. <br /></li> </ol> Trust me all of these programs, extensions, plugins, sites, pay for themselves 100x over by the amazing data and help they provide for us marketers and SEO experts/specialists. I would not be able to live without these amazing tools and I recommend you try all of them at least once before deciding to make a choice on them. I am more than sure you will end up stay using them because they are AMAZING tools. They really are. Enough said.<br /> *The link for Market Samurai is an affiliate link and is the only affiliate program that I have with any of the above SEO tools. You can use the non-affiliate link followed right after the affiliate link through any affiliate helps my site continues to operate since I make no money through The Legit $ociety and use it as a hobby project to help aspiring entrepreneurs and not to make money. <br /> TL;DR: <br /> <ol> <li><a href="?id=6929">AHREFs</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=5148">Majestic</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=4994">Moz</a> and <a href="?id=14683">Open Site Explorer</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=10838">Market Samurai</a>/<a href="?id=12729">Non-Affiliate Link</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=8152">YOAST SEO</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=10065">Google’s Keyword Planner Tool</a> <-Read the part on this one if you want to learn how to use it for free since it now requires you to have an AdWords account to use. I give you help on how to get by that requirement without actually having to pay so I recommend you at least read that one up there.<br /></li> <li><a href="?id=11248">SumoMe Plugin</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=4190">SEOQuake Chrome Extension</a><br /></li> <li><a href="?id=3621">HootSuite</a> <br /></li> <li><a href="?id=15278">SEMRush</a><br /></li> </ol> <strong>Some Bonus mentions:</strong> <a href="?id=13134">SpyFu</a>, <a href="?id=5124">Keyword.io</a>, <a href="?id=14178">Google Analytics</a> (of course), <a href="?id=3674">Alexa</a>, <a href="?id=13617">BuzzSumo</a>, and <a href="?id=13389">DeepCrawl</a>.<br /> I hope this post is of some use to you guys/gals.<br /> -Alving J. Garcia Marcano (Blogger @ The Legit Society - <a href="?id=13115">http://www.thelegitblog.com</a>)<br /> </div> submitted by <a href="?id=1790"> alvingjgarcia </a> to <a href="?id=12801"> marketing </a> <span><a href="?id=10167">[link]</a></span> <span><a href="?id=982">[comments]</a></span></p> <h5>New client: How to boost a news site's traffic?</h5> <p><div class="md">Hi guys!<br />  <br /> I'm from Hungary, my company is doing SEO for more than 3 years, we were doing mainly affiliate marketing and local SEO. This week while doing outreach for a Plastic Surgery I gained a potentially new client.<br />  <br /> They are an online and offline magazine, the official paper of the Hungarian Chamber of Pharmacists, so it's a well written, decent paper, but they have no idea about online presence. I met with their online sales manager guy, her only goal is to increase their online traffic, so they can increase their revenue by selling ads.<br />  <br /> I never done such thing before, we were focusing mainly on "traditional" SEO. This is the webpage, if you check it in Ahref or Majestic it's pretty decent. (but you won't understand it, because it's in Hungarian: <a href="?id=244">http://www.patikamagazin.hu/</a> ). The website is a mess, it's not looking good, they are not using any interlinks, it's no wonder they don't have many readers. <br />  <br /> So my question is: what can a SEO specialist offer them as service, how can I grow their online traffic. As you can imagine, they don't have a tech guy, so they are willing to pay good money for anything that seems useful. We don't have the capacity to make a whole new webpage for such a big portal, we were mainly doing small WordPress pages. Also, I don't see such a big potential in growing their social media presence, it's not my area of expertise, also it takes forever and I don't want 1 of my guy to hang on Facebook all day.<br />  <br /> I was thinking about:<br /> <ul> <li>Creating a newsletter service for them.<br /></li> <li>The website is pretty strong so it would easily rank for popular KW-s. I'm thinking about doing a KW research and "jump-start" their traffic by boosting some articles.<br /></li> <li>Restructuring the website, make the popular articles more easily accessible. Checking out their popular article and why they are popular. How do I do that? I used heat map before, but for such a big site it's a pain in the ass. I don't know if simple google analytics is enough.<br /></li> <li>Interlinking their articles. They don't use interlinks at all. With more interlinks, people would stay longer on their site. My problem is, I don't really know how I can check what to link where effectively in a site which has hundreds of articles.<br /></li> </ul>  <br /> What do you think guys, do you have any experience in that field? Any more idea? Any help would be appreciated!<br /> </div> submitted by <a href="?id=1301"> sarahunter </a> to <a href="?id=3947"> bigseo </a> <span><a href="?id=4742">[link]</a></span> <span><a href="?id=6370">[comments]</a></span></p> <!-- все картинки: --> <p> <img width="100" height="60" alt="" title="" src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi//default.jpg" /> </p> <!-- описания: --> <p>Without Majestic, Search Engine Marketing (SEM) professionals and others would just be playing a guessing game. Fast forward a few years and now he runs his own business which still focuses on affiliate marketing but also SEO and online marketing services. Author; Recent Posts; Majestic Marketing. Latest posts by Majestic Marketing . Use this powerful SEO tool to get access to detailed information about your website or develop your own digital marketing platform. we may earn an affiliate commission. Majestic SEO is an 3) Affiliate SEO Mastery. Affiliate Commissions: 50% commissions on this great SEO course. Affiliate Signup Link: Click Here. Website: Here. Affiliate Description: Affiliate SEO Mastery is one of the most talked about SEO training courses of 2018. This is a great affiliate program for every affiliate marketing/SEO websites that cater to beginners. Majestic is a great marketing tool for reverse-engineering the backlink profiles of your competitors, which can help give you some insights into how they're ranking for specific keywords.. Personally I use Majestic for cross-checking the metrics of a site when I'm purchasing expired domains, to use either for my PBN (private blog network) or to build on because of their pre-existing authority. Majestic surveys and maps the Internet and has created the largest commercial Link Intelligence database in the world. This Internet map is used by SEOs, New Media Specialists, Affiliate Managers</p> <!-- простая и быстрая линковка: --> <p>[<a href="/">index</a>] [<a href="?id=14144">14144</a>] [<a href="?id=7533">7533</a>] [<a href="?id=44">44</a>] [<a href="?id=11370">11370</a>] [<a href="?id=8952">8952</a>] [<a href="?id=13886">13886</a>] [<a href="?id=1122">1122</a>] [<a href="?id=6553">6553</a>] [<a href="?id=7158">7158</a>] [<a href="?id=2013">2013</a>] </p> <!-- заглавие с ютуба: --> <h2></h2> <!-- описания с ютуба: --> <p></p> <!-- продвинутая линковка с анкорами: --> <ul><li><a href="?id=14554">dukascopy форекс</a></li><li><a href="?id=9359">kings sports betting co ug</a></li><li><a href="?id=8185">стратегии форекс против толпы</a></li><li><a href="?id=3173">betting odds explained 8 15</a></li><li><a href="?id=6966">tradewest forex review rated</a></li><li><a href="?id=13207">david aranzabal forex charts</a></li><li><a href="?id=6058">william hill odds comparison betting</a></li><li><a href="?id=4901">online betting ipl 2013 kkr</a></li><li><a href="?id=4442">лучший международный форекс брокер</a></li><li><a href="?id=11964">принципы торговли по конвертам из ema форекс</a></li></ul> </body> </html> <!-- ID: 715841 | Time: 0.00823 Sec | Mem: 1799 KiB --><script data-cfasync="false" src="/cdn-cgi/scripts/5c5dd728/cloudflare-static/email-decode.min.js"></script>